All about Fishing, Fly Fishing, Deep Sea Fishing, Bass Fishing and Adding A Fish Pond To Your Backyard

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All about Fishing, Fly Fishing, Deep Sea Fishing, Bass Fishing and Adding A Fish Pond To Your Backyard


Bass Fishing

Bass fishing is one of the most common types of fishing. Many bass fish are found in bayou water and salt water. They also move through lakes, ponds, reservoirs and streams. If you know the basics regarding conditions and places where bass are likely to be, you will have more success when you fish for them.

Many variables change the location of bass, such as water conditions, water levels, weather, and light and food availability. There are three main elements that must be present in a body of water in order for bass to survive: Food, oxygen, and cover.

A bass’ favorite meal is crawfish, which they prefer over shad. Basically, crawfish are usually more plentiful and they are easy for the Bass to catch. However, a bass will typically eat anything from rats, mice, ducklings, frogs, snakes, salamanders, worms, lizards, grubs, baitfish, insects, and leeches. Their ability to feast on one thing above another is why many people find such enjoyment from fishing bass.

Oxygen is another key component in finding bass fish. The basic rule of thumb is that the cooler the water, the more oxygen content. Therefore, if you are fishing in the spring, summer or early fall, you will find that the larger bass will drop down lower to find the cooler and more oxygen-filled water. They will also swim to find areas that are more concentrated in vegetation in order to find a better oxygen source. Trees, stumps, wind-blown banks, and power plants are all good sources of oxygen that will attract bass fish.

A bass relies on cover for a means of protection and way of ambush. Cover is part of a bass’ survival. The bass is known as a lazy fish, so they will hide and wait for their prey to come to them. The other reason for cover is that bass fish do not have eyelids and the cover is a way to prevent blindness. Some common cover areas to find bass in are around fabricated wood structures such as fencerows, docks, and pilings. They have been known to hide under floating pieces of wood or decaying wood. Weeds are the second best place to hunt for bass. Finally, rocks are the third place that bass will find cover. Rocks are not as reliable as weeds or wood, but sometimes a bass will find decaying pieces of food to feast on within some rocks. Remember that rocks do not produce oxygen, so the source is not as consistent.

When it comes to fishing, everyone has a different opinion. You will often find that these opinions range in location and source. However, there are some lures and baits that are recommended for bass fishing that may be useful if you haven’t tried them. Tequila colored 7-inch worms with added scent are recommended, as well as Rebel Wee-Rs. Hellgrammites are thought to be the best live bait, and many will say that you don’t need big lures to attract big bass. Everyone will tell you to tie up to an embankment, or find a dock to get close to, but it is really an art that could take years to perfect.

Bass are notorious for slow moving and lack of distance in their movements. Logically, you could sit 30 feet from the biggest bass of your life, and he is not going to swim to your bait out of pure laziness. Finding the exact spot is difficult and a lot of fishing has to do with luck. The only part that you can control is finding the most likely places that a bass may be and exercise some patience. Weather is important to bass as well. If it is a cloudy day, you might have more luck than on a hot summer day. However, overcast is probably ideal for water temperatures, but then you have to decide what you are willing to sit through in order to catch a fish. The bottom line with bass fishing is you can only do your best with the knowledge at hand.

Catch and Release Fishing

Fishing is a sport, but it has become less about survival and more about fun in recent decades. There is an issue of fish becoming depleted and many anglers are now employing the practice of catch and release fishing. Catch and release fishing is a great theory, but many people are doing it incorrectly and as a result many fish are dying. A few steps should be followed when trying to catch and release a fish. Once you get the hang of how to do it correctly, you will be able to enjoy your hobby and keep the population of fish full in your favorite stream or lake.

The best place to start is with the hooks. A fish that has a hole through its mouth is going to be more likely to survive than a fish with a hole in its lung or gill. If you happen to hook a fish in the gut, the best thing to do is to cut off the hook as much as you can then release the fish. Many times the hook will dissolve and the fish will spit it out, but they can also live with a rusted hook hanging from them. Whatever you do, do not tug on your line to pull a hook out or you will severely hurt the fish. If you are able to easily remove the hook, use a pair of needle nose pliers. The process of pulling the hook out is easier if you remove the barbs from the hooks, but try not to wiggle while you pull the hook out.

Fish are obviously unable to survive outside of the water. Therefore, the longer that it takes you to release them, the more it becomes as if you are suffocating them. The way that a fish is gripped when out of the water will make a big difference. For instance, avoid touch a fish’s body with your bare hands. The fish have a slimy protective coat that will be stripped if you touch them with your hands. If you have to touch a fish, make sure that your hands are wet. You may want to wear gloves to protect your hands from cuts or permeating fish smells.

Part of the fun in fishing is to “play out” the fish. The struggle can be what some anglers wait all day to do. Fish are like humans; when they “work out,” they build up lactic acid. When you are fighting a fish, they are fighting too. Just like when someone works his or her body out and it feels sore, a fish experiences the same thing. The build up of lactic acid can be toxic to a fish even days later. Therefore, if you are going to practice catch and release, try to keep the struggle to a minimum.

Try not to let a fish flop around when you catch them. A fish that flops around can bruise or damage its internal organs, causing them to die later from the injuries that are incurred. You can also revive a fish if you need to do so. A fish is likely to run out of oxygen and pass out, so to speak. In order to revive a fish, you place the fish in the water with their belly down and gently grasp their tail. Start to slowly move their tail back and forth until they give you the signal that they are ready to take off into the water. Sometimes you will need to repeat the process more than once, but don’t let a fish go until they are ready. A fish that is not ready to swim could get carried away and swept into rocks or embankment and cause serious injury.

More than anything, when you are practicing catch and release, have everything ready to go. Make sure that your camera, pliers, and gloves are in reaching distance. Try to take the precautions necessary to preserve fish and one of America’s favorite pastimes.

For some people, fishing is a pastime. For others among us, it is a serious sport. However you perceive it, fishing is enjoyable when you’ve got the proper accessories to use. Here is a list of some considerations to think over.

Often there is a nice spot to fish from the shore of a pond, lake, stream or river. Other times, you will need to consider what kind of transportation you will need to get over the water. The canoe is the oldest craft. It is the traditional vehicle of the American Indian and has great traditional value, but that does not mean it is the best kind of water transportation available. A canoe can be tippy at the best of times and especially hard to handle in the wind but paddling or drifting along makes it easy to approach good spots to fish undetected.

A small rowboat without a motor is considered the best kind of boat to use since you can stand up in it to cast. Although it is best to row to the spot where you intend to fish, a small trolling motor is handy for travelling some distances. Larger pleasure boats with outboards are also recommended, but a boat with high sides is best as big lakes and broad rivers are prone to winds that can whip up big waves.

You will also need to pick out some quality footwear. This becomes especially important if you are going to fish by the side of a lake. Hip boots are the most practical for this as they can be rolled down if you’re not wading. While hip boots can also be used for stream wading, chest or hip waders are traditionally best here. When choosing chest or hip-wader boots, select ones that have a loose fit. Having waders that are too tight could restrict leg motion and undue stress on the seams could leave you wet.

The proper jacket is also a necessity. Jackets come in two basic lengths: Long and short. The long style is designed for fishing from a boat or wading in shallow water. If you are planning to use chest waders, it is recommended you use a short jacket since the bottom of a long jacket would drag in the water. You should select a jacket with generous pockets for carrying lure boxes and other accessories. A hat with a visor is another good idea because you will have your eyes on the water and need some kind of shade.

The avid angler has three stashes of lure and tackle-box containers. The first stash is for the home stockpile, the second and larger one for the boat, and a third stash is for the car. That way, you will always be covered in the event of a loss or other mishap. It is a good idea to buy a large supply at the beginning of the season too so you will have lots on hand, especially if you like to fish at night.

With the right fishing accessories and gear, you can turn your fishing experience into a better one. The last thing you want when the time for that perfect catch nears is to realize you are missing an important piece of equipment. Preparedness is among the most important aspects of fishing, so make sure that you have all of the gear you need to have the best experience of your life.

If you are new to the sport of fishing, you need to know some of the basic rules of fishing. Like other forms of hunting, fishing involves both your environment and those around you. Be respectful of both. You can responsibly enjoy this treasured pastime in several ways.
 
Fishing is an ancient practice. It dates back nearly 10,000 years. A number of various techniques and traditions have been used during fishing's progression. Modern technological developments have changed the way people fish, but many of the same rules, regulations, and social norms involving fishing remain.
 
Always practice good stewardship of our waterways when you are fishing. Remember that these waterways were around thousands of years before you and will remain long after we are gone. You can make a conscious decision to leave the areas in which people fish in better condition than when you found it. Take care of our lakes, rivers, and other waterways so that others will enjoy these areas for years to come. Practicing certain behaviors will ensure that you are taking good care of the places where people fish.
 
Never litter when you are fishing. Always bring a trash bag or other receptacle to use for the collection of your trash. You can easily deposit it in a nearby trash receptacle. Dump your refuse in properly assigned dumping stations instead of tossing it in the water. You do not need to spend much time figuring out the many ways in which this hurts the environment.
 
As you fish, always use the correct type of bait and fishing gear. Certain areas allow for certain bait and gear. You will also encounter limits on the number, size, and kind of fish that you can keep. Become familiar with what these limits are and pay attention to them. Do not wait until you are at your fishing spot to search for what is allowed and what is not. Check with your destination before you head out on your fishing trip to see what the local regulations allow. If you plan on using a boat while fishing, research to see what kinds of watercraft are allowed where you are going to fish.
 
Every fishing location is different, so pay special attention to local procedures and cautions. This also applies when you decide to clean your boat after you leave the water. You do not want to spread non-native species to another body of water.
 
Finally, never fish where it is not permitted. There is always a reason why it is illegal. Some reasons include the protection of certain wildlife, the proper care of vegetation, and the safety of you and others who want to fish.
 
You should also follow a number of cautionary behaviors to ensure your safety. As with all forms of hunting, safety is first. If you will be using a boat while you fish, always wear your life jacket. Make sure that your passengers wear their life jackets, as well.
 
Be very careful when baiting and removing hooks. Make sure that you never fish on unauthorized waterways. Follow the posted speed limits and wake warnings that accompany the use of a boat. Bring with you all relevant safety items, such as water, flashlights, maps, and a cell phone.
 
Fishing continues to be a favorite pastime. 2001 saw nearly 16% of the U.S. population over the age of 16 spend 16 days fishing. You enjoy the sport of fishing, so follow the rules that allow for the continuation of fishing. Be responsible and courteous of others and your environment. Take time to discover how you can be both a better and safer angler.
 


Fishing for Sharks

It seems like every sport has a category that is set aside for the extreme. Believe it or not, there are some that were not deterred by the movie Jaws and they choose to seek out sharks instead of run from them. If you are so bold as to take on shark fishing, you should understand some basics before hitting the open sea.

If your goal is to actually catch a shark, the best time to do it is in June. The temperature is not too hot and it will attract more of the predators you seek. If you decide to fish for sharks in the middle of the summer, you should be aware of water temperatures and try to find the coolest spot possible.

When you plan a shark-fishing trip, you need to be prepared. Many people would advise keeping a checklist beforehand in order to help you with preparation. Some things that you should include when packing for your trip are chum and proper gear. Your rods and reels should be able to handle a three hundred fish or greater. Typically, you should plan to fish with three to five baits in the water at a time. Therefore, you will need many rod and reel setups to accompany the ratio of bait.

The best rod to use is a fifty to eighty pound class rod. You should not forget your harness and safety straps (you do not want to fall overboard and become live bait). In addition, you want to remember your bait and chum. Running chum is the most effective way to trap a shark so be prepared for a mess onboard.

It is important to know what species of shark you are wanting to fish. Different sharks swim at different levels and temperatures. In order to set a shark trap, you will have to tie your farthest bait off the bow rail with a flat line clip. Make sure that the line is out of the way and stay in the highest rocket holder on the particular side of the boat from which you are fishing. You should attach your bait, attach a weight or balloon on the line, and plunge it approximately eighty feet. The second rod’s bait is set down sixty feet while resting in the trolling holder; this line is also attached to the midship with a rubber band. The third line is set down thirty feet with no balloon but rather free bait. You should make sure that your drags are loose so that you will be alerted early by the clicking sound of the reel. If you color code your balloons, it will be easier to tell which rod is being pulled.

Once you have waited and finally caught your shark, be prepared. Sharks will have different temperaments and act according to their agitation. Some sharks have been known to slightly drag the bait before they swallow, while other sharks will run at the boat, run in the opposing direction from the boat, or come right up to the boat. If you need a harness, make sure that the harness is safely attached to the boat and the reel.

Once you have the shark close to the boat, your experienced sidekick will be able to help. You will want to hand wire the shark into the boat. Hand wires are meant to be sturdy and they will not break if you are attached to them. Do not wrap the wire around your hand because you want to be able to let go of the wire easily if you have to. If you are keeping a shark, you will need to gaff and rope it by its tail.

Remember that you should only keep a shark if you have plans to eat it, use it in a tournament or if you believe it is a contender for the world record. You can take a picture with the shark without killing it.

Fishing With Children

Often times as adults, we want to share our hobbies and pastimes with our children. However, it can be difficult to decide when that pastime is appropriate. Children have shorter attention spans that make it difficult to calculate when they are ready for certain things. Fishing is a common hobby of many people around the world and many people are eager to introduce their children to fishing the minute they can hold a fishing rod. Fishing is a lesson in patience for children and a structured way to teach them a sport that involves precision and safety.

When you take your child fishing, the most important thing to keep in mind is their safety. What kind of fishing are you trying to introduce? Are you thinking about a day of bottom fishing? Does pier fishing suit your needs? Are you going to go all out and take your child for a deep-sea fishing excursion?

Regardless of what you decide is best, you should have the basic safety essentials with you at all times. A first aid kit is mandatory because whenever a kid is involved accidents will happen. Children tend to get poked, scratched, and barbed, so you need to be prepared. If you are going out into the sea and away from the shore, make sure that you have life jackets and make sure that your child is wearing one even he or she has no intention of getting into the water. Keep in mind your child’s abilities when it comes to swimming. If you do not think that they are a strong swimmer, you may want to keep your boat docked.

Make sure to buy and stock your child’s tackle box. A youngster’s first tackle box should be small and lightweight. There is nothing complex about the contents of a beginner's tackle box. All a child needs are some pre-tied hooks, some bobbers, a couple of weights, swivels, and small scissors or fingernail clippers to cut their line. A tackle box is a fingerprint for many who view it as a personal expression. Let your child see the basics so that they can build their own to represent themselves one-day.

Make sure to lead by example when you take your child fishing. Teach them how to keep the line taut so that they will be able to respond properly if a fish bites their line. As soon as your child feels the bite, teach them how to set the hook. Tug back on the rod in order to firmly set the hook in the fish’s lip. Take the time with your child to let them learn techniques like “playing the fish”. Part of the fun of fishing is the struggle between the man and the fish, so let your child have the entire experience and not just a partial one.

When you introduce fishing to your child, you have certain advantages to teaching them at a younger rather than older age. Younger child have a greater absorption rate with a desire to soak up as much information as they can. Take the time that you and your child are sharing to educate them about catch and release regulations and fishing for food as opposed to pleasure. If your child decides that they want to let the fish that you catch go, make sure that you know the right way to release. Cleaning the fish can either make a child vomit or ask when the next trip is going to be, so use discretion in regards to age when preparing your catch for dinner.
There will be good days and bad days when fishing with your kids. Kids have a tendency to not listen, become disinterested fast or fall asleep at inopportune times. Patience is the key to taking children out for a day of fishing. Repetition will also make your child more comfortable with the whole process. Regardless of whether a fish is caught or not, take the time to bond with your child while using fishing as an excuse.

Fishing With GPS

In this day and age, you would be hard pressed to find a fishing boat without some sort of fish finding device. GPS devices have become the latest in technology and water safety when it comes to fishing. They are used as a means of navigation and a way to mark your spot so that you can find it again in the future.

A GPS is a Global Positioning System that is made primarily for navigational purposes. They work off a network of satellites that are placed into orbit by the United States Government. The best part about a GPS system is that because they operate off satellite, they can be used in any weather conditions at any hour of the day.

The satellites will circle the earth twice during the day and transmit signal information to Earth. The signals can then be used to calculate the user’s exact location by implementing triangulation and pinpointing exact spots. Triangulation means that the GPS receiver must be locked into three spots before a calculation of longitude and latitude can be displayed. After the satellites have mapped the location, the GPS can narrow in on other satellites for useful information such as speed, track, trip distance, destination distance and sunrise or sunset times.

The accuracy of the GPS system is very acute because of the multi-channel designs that are available. A GPS will lock onto a satellite and maintain that lock through one of their channels. A GPS fish finder is accurate up to fifteen meters while the newer models increase in accuracy up to three meters.

There are many benefits to investing in a GPS and people are using GPS more regularly and relying on them more than the more traditional ways of navigation such as maps and charts. If you have plot points that you have saved on a GPS, you may be able to save time and frustration on the open seas by going directly to the location that had the fish the last time you went out. Another advantage to the GPS is that it can detect hot fishing spots that may not be detected by older maps or charts. In addition, if you find a perfect fishing spot, you can share it with a friend when you go fishing on another boat.

GPS systems are also a great safety tool when you are out on the water. Many times, especially if there are many people socializing on a boat, it can be easy to lose concentration. People will easily be turned around or lost and a GPS is an easy tool to use to find your way back home. You can also use a GPS system if there is unexpected bad weather such as fog or heavy rain. GPS systems are also equipped with mapping software that makes it easier to find a dock. The GPS is so accurate that it is able to communicate exact positions to the Coast Guard or rescue crew if an emergency arises.

You can purchase a handheld GPS online or at your local marine or boating store. Ask a salesperson to help explain the different features and costs for the varying models. If you decide to purchase your boat from a dealer, you will need a built-in GPS. Your local boat supplier will be able to give you a reference to someone who can properly install your electronics.
You should never rely on just one navigation tool when you are fishing. A GPS seems to cover all of the bases, but it is still a computerized tool. You should always be proactive about your safety and always have marine maps and charts onboard at all times. You should also have a handheld radio handy in case of emergencies.

Fishing with Live Bait

There are many myths that surround using live bait instead of artificial and most of them are not true. Live bait is still used by many anglers. The one factual part of live bait, which no one can dispute, it that is often messy, and it smells terrible. If you can surmount these two factors, you will be in good shape to try live bait on your next fishing outing.

There are some basic principles that should not be ignored when using live bait. None of the principles concerning live bait are clean or nice, but they are mandatory. You should never handle live bait when your hands are dry. Bait has a slimy layer on the outside, which is protective as well as inviting to predators, and if your hands are dry you will risk removing that layer.

If you are running short on live bait, try to save the bait that dies in your live well or in a nearby bucket. When your live bait has run out, you will still be able to use the freshly dead bait on your hook to attract fish. All you have to do is cast your line and bob it a little to give the appearance that your decoy has some life left. Be careful of the weight that you put on a line with live bait. Fish are going to spot a weight if it is too heavy and weighting down the bait. Your weight or sinker should be light enough to give the bait the appearance of free floating in the water.

Seasonal fishing can change the perspective on live bait. For instance, the summer months can be brutal, especially in the South. You may need to adjust your thinking and practices when the summer months hit. Keeping the bait alive will be the hardest obstacle for any angler in the summer. In order to keep your bait living, you will need to change out the water regularly so that the oxygen can keep flowing through to the bait. However, you can’t just stop at changing out the water.

The temperature of the water is crucial because the water on the surface is hot and deadly for living bait. Therefore, having ice on hand to put into the live well will be the most beneficial way of keeping your live bait happy until they reach the hook. There is also a bait shortage during the summer months on things like shrimp and live croaker. You will save yourself a lot of time if you call the bait shop the night before to ensure that the bait you want is available. The shrimp are the most common bait in the summertime, but they are not as effective as you may think. When everyone is using shrimp, the fish are not as excited by them because they see them everywhere. Try using a baitfish that is not as often used in the summer months and guarantee a better chance of catching a fish.

Some other tips you should keep in mind when fishing with live bait is to never hook your live bait in the eyes. The reason is that you want the bait to see the fish approach them because they will become more excited and it will cause the fish to latch on better. Another thing is that you should add water softener salt to the water that is holding your live bait. The salt will make the scales of your bait harder while instantaneously preserving the slimy coat that attracts predators.

Lastly, you should make sure that you know how to properly throw a casting net before trying to catch bait. People often times throw the net too hard or too soft and this results in frustration and a net that does not consistently open.

Live bait can come in handy when you are trying to have a big day out at sea. Reason and logic will tell you that a fish would be more attracted to real food as oppose to faux food. However, the live bait does increase the workload so make sure you are prepared to deal with the entire package before committing to fishing with live bait.

People been fishing for sport for in around fifty generations now. What started as a means of survival has become a favourite pastime in North America and beyond, creating a hunger for fishing tips and aspects of fishing to be revealed in many different contexts. Learning about fishing and learning about different types of fish can be very exciting and interesting to many people.

Trout is the most common freshwater fish. They are equal to any other of the sport fish and they stand at the top of the food chain in most rivers and streams where they live. Years ago, a successful angler was judged by how many of these popular fish he could catch at one time, but now the wise angler practises catch-and-release tactics so the numbers of trout will always be plentiful. Part of what makes an angler a responsible one is caring for the sport of fishing and fish populations for generations to come.

The most popular trout fish that anglers enjoy trying to lure in is known as the “brown trout”. The brown trout provides plenty of excitement for anglers and tests fishing skills. Because it often feeds on the surface, the brown trout is considered a fish designed for the angler. It is a cold-water fish that lives in lakes and streams and jumps around the most when the water temperature is just right The brown trout got its reputation from rich English gentleman who enjoyed the trout’s fight. The world record brown trout weighed around forty pounds and was taken in Arkansas in 1992.

One of the most the most glamorized fish of the trout family actually is not a trout at all. Surprisingly, scientists have recently discovered the rainbow trout is actually a smaller cousin of the Pacific Salmon. Rainbow trout are considered a peaceful fish despite their family heritage. They coexist with any other fish in the stream. While the brown trout prefers slower water and calmer pools, the rainbow trout likes the more oxygen-rich fast running water. That enthusiasm makes the rainbow a favourite of the angler.

There is yet another trout that is not actually a trout. The Brooke trout or “brookie” lives in the cooler streams of the north-eastern US and is related to the char. This makes it a relative of the lake trout rather than a member of the family. Because the fish is only found in wilderness areas, the Brooke trout is a special favourite with anglers. Wherever they’re found, fisherman can be sure the water is pure and the ecology unspoiled. The “brookie” is often criticized for being pretty but not necessarily smart. Although anglers praise them for their beauty, it’s well known that there are harder fish to catch. The world record for the biggest Brooke trout takes place in Canada in 1918. A fourteen-pound “brookie” was caught in the Nipigon River in Ontario, Canada.

Other trout species include the red trout, a species that enjoys hiding in bracken and branches, and the deeper-water lake trout. Current population control laws protect the lake trout, requiring anglers to release catches that measure certain sizes. The size of the lake trout indicates its potential to spawn and release fertilized eggs. With continued programs of trout population protection and responsible fishing, the trout will certainly continue to survive for generations to come.

Hawaii Charter Fishing

Sometimes the hardest thing about going on vacation is the overdose of downtime. You want to find enough things to do to keep you busy, but not too much to where you feel overloaded. Chartering a fishing boat has its advantages, but on the island of Hawaii, it is a day trip that you do not want to miss. There are certain basics when chartering a boat, but since Hawaii is not just a hop, skip and jump away, you want to make your plans ahead of time while having all of your questions answered.

First of all, you will need a boat. Hawaii has hundreds of charter boats throughout the islands, so availability will not be an issue. The companies that charter boats have certain criteria that they have to follow in order to run their business. The boat must be inspected for proper gear, maintenance, and repair history. They are also inspected for their experience level. No one wants to pay for a charter and catch a fish that the crew cannot handle.

The charter trips are typically broken up into various price categories. Prices will vary depending on where you are staying and where you want to fish. For instance, Kona has the lowest prices but the most competition for marlin fishing while Lahaina is the most expensive.

If you are concerned about the fish, do not worry. Most of the charters will succumb to whatever you want to do with your catches. If you want to take them home or if you want to cook them for dinner, it should not matter as long as you make your requests up front. Hawaii does have a deep-rooted tradition of selling Billfish and this concept offends many anglers. Today, many charters are willing to throw the Billfish back (at the customer’s request), but don’t be surprised if this is not the case.

You should also know that when you charter a boat, you are not chartering fish. A charter is to allow you to have an experience out on the water enjoying the scenery and trying to catch a fish. Fishing is a sport where there are no guarantees and there is no way of predicting where fish will be and when. If you charter a boat with the expectation of a refund for a bad catch day, you will be disappointed. There is no charter trip that will refund your money for a lack of fish on a given day.

Some of the things that you will need when you charter a boat for the day are not what you may expect. Most boats will provide you with tackle and equipment, but that is it. You are expected to bring your own snacks and drinks. You should also invest in some Bullfrog sunscreen, which is waterproof and commonly used on boats. Another good tool essential to fishing are sunglasses. Your sunglasses should be polarized so that you can see the fish clearer than other glasses. Lastly, bring an extra towel and t-shirt because you will probably get wet.

Make sure to leave your bananas behind. Hawaii, as well as many other fishing places, has a strict policy against bananas being onboard. They are thought to bring bad luck, so do not try to test this theory or your day may be extremely unpleasant.

Hawaii can be a little more difficult to plan a fishing trip on the spur of the moment because the locals usually have conflicting opinions. Try to do some research on the islands that you want to fish and then book a charter through a major company that has a trusted record.

Heritage Fishing: Fishing in the Past for the Future

Heritage fisheries are carefully maintained aquatic preserves in various parts of the world where a tradition or habitat surrounding fishing has been protected from today’s modern hazards. A heritage fishery may be a lake, river or part of the ocean; its locale having less to do with its heritage designation than preservation of a certain style or era. Heritage fishing's purpose is twofold: to experience fishing as it was in the past and to preserve fishing for the future.

Glendalough State Park is the newest member of the Minnesota State Parks family. Its land was given to the state by a private donor in the 1990s and the lakes on the park acreage were fished privately for nearly a hundred years. No one other than members of the donor’s family or their guests was allowed to utilize the lakes at Glendalough State Park. As a result, fish sizes and populations in the Glendalough lakes are more representative of historic times than of modern times.

Annie Battle Lake, the largest of the Glendalough Lakes, allows the angler to experience fishing as it was in Minnesota during the 1800s. Motors of any kind are not allowed on the lake. Canoes and rowboats are available for rental at the park office and shore fishing is a pleasure from any location here. Gas powered vehicles are prohibited, as are any type of electronic fish-finding device.

Large bass, panfish, walleye and northern pike abound under the crystal clear waters of Annie Battle Lake because the waters are unpolluted by gas or oil. Catch-and-release regulations and fishing limits are strictly enforced here, maintaining the size and count of the population for generations to come. A small brook connecting Annie Battle Lake to another of the park lakes is waist deep with a sandy bottom, providing excellent wading areas for bass fishing.

The Lave Net Fishery at Blackrock on the Severn Estuary in Wales is the last of its kind in Wales and has also been designated as a heritage fishery. Treacherous tidal waters averaging speeds of 7-8 knots have witnessed generations of fishermen pass along this fishing technique. Less than a dozen lave net fishing licenses are issued by the Welsh government each year, with all belonging to a local association dedicated to preserving this unique method of salmon fishing. The only noticeable difference between modern and historic lave netters are that they now sport waders as opposed to animal skins.

The lave net itself, a Y-shaped structure constructed of wood and a hand-made net, remains unchanged. Anglers wade into the river and either “cower”, waiting for the salmon to approach him, or watch for the telltale salmon splashes announcing their location. The fisherman can then net the fish before they head to deeper water. This kind of fishing is restricted by law and by the tides. Anglers have about 1.5 hours before low tide to practice their craft when conditions are calm. Their knowledge of the tides and of the area, received from the generation before, serves as their guide.

Kjaerra Laxefiske on the Kjaerrafossen River near Helgeland, Norway dates back to 1388. Ownership of the two heritage fisheries here is marked by the “markebol”, a medieval unit of measurement. Salmon are caught via the use of ancient fishing tools, while the buildings surrounding the fisheries were restored to medieval timber and stone during the 1950s. Visitors are welcomed to the weekly opening of salmon pots every Thursday where the catch of the week is revealed.

Wherever they are located, heritage fisheries are an important part of the environment and the community. In addition to offering the simple thrill of fishing itself, they provide an opportunity to learn from the past, as well as preserving the present heritage of fishing for future anglers.

The next time you drop a line in the water off the side of a boat equipped with the latest sonar devices, dig into the cooler beside your feet for a favourite beverage and kick your feet up to enjoy a relaxing day of fishing.

Fishing is one of the oldest activities known to man. Archaeologists have found ancient dumps of shell and bone, cave paintings depicting fishing and even hooks made from bone. There is even a theory that states we might be closer to the fish we try and catch than we think. The “Aquatic Ape Hypothesis” contends that human beings spent a time living by and catching their food from the shallows of lakes and oceans. The controversial theory contends years of living that helped us to look different from the apes and chimpanzees thought by some to be our ancestors because of this time evolving by water.

The ancient river Nile was an angler’s paradise. The Egyptians relied on fresh and dried fish as a staple in their diets, and the various methods they used have been well represented in many ancient representations from their lives. Although they had some tools like nets, baskets and even hooks and lines, the fish caught were often clubbed to death. Perch, catfish and eels were among the most important catches in the Egyptian times.

The other bed of civilization, Greece, did not share Egypt’s love of fishing. Still, there is a depiction on a wine cup from 500 BC that shows a boy kneeling over a stream with a live capture net in the water below him. It’s unclear why the boy was ‘fishing’ however, since the device is clearly for live capture. There is also evidence the Romans fished with nets and tridents off the sides of boats. One of their most famous Gods, Neptune, is depicted usually with a fishing trident. There are references to fishing in the Bible, too.

Perhaps the most recognizable tool for fishing is the hook. No one knows for certain, but it’s quite probable prehistoric man was using some form of a hook over 40,000 years ago. Experts have had some problems pinning down exact dates since they know most of the materials used back then were most likely wood and not very durable. British Isle anglers catch fish with hooks made from the hawthorn bush, right up to the present day. Although Stone Age man had the tools necessary for making bone hooks, it is hard for scientists to get exact dates since bone does not define its age well. The oldest known hooks have turned up in Czechoslovakia, but others have turned up in Egypt and Palestine. The Palestinian hooks are believed to be over 9,000 years old, proving that fishing has been around for a very long time indeed.

Indians on Easter Island made their hooks from a gruesome material. Since human sacrifices were abundant in the area for some time, the natives made their fish hooks out of the most plentiful material around – human bone. Fish hooks made of human bone were the norm there until missionaries arrived at the turn of the last century. In addition to hooks made of stone, bone or wood, ancient man often combined material to make composite hooks with barbs that kept the bait on.

Before you attempt to catch fish, you need to find out where they are. Remember that fish are found nearly everywhere there is water with sufficient levels of food, oxygen, and cover. You are certain to be within a relatively close distance to a body of water that has fish living in it. For an angler, this is good news. They are there - now you have to find them!
 
All fish are different. Because of this, they do not all live in the same kind of waters. Fish tolerate different environmental conditions. Some of these include differing levels of salt, amounts of oxygen, types and amounts of food, water temperature, and hiding areas. The most distinguishing element of fish is salt. Some fish do not live in areas where there is a lot of salt. On the other hand, some fish need salt to survive. There are also some types of fish that can live in both saltwater and freshwater. 
 
Freshwater ponds, reservoirs, and rivers contain significantly less salt than the ocean. North America has a majority of freshwater bodies. Some of the fish that you will find in these freshwater bodies are the bluegill, carp, catfish, crappie, and bass. In contrast, many species of fish live in the ocean's salty water. Thanks to their kidneys, these fish are able to keep the proper balance of salt in their body. The more popular saltwater fish are the bluefish, cod, sea trout, tuna, and flounder. 
 
Another factor that weighs heavily on where you will find certain fish is oxygen. All fish must have a certain level of oxygen to survive. Some fish, such as carp, survive on less oxygen than fish like trout. The living plants within a lake or stream directly affect the amount of oxygen in the water. They add oxygen to the water through photosynthesis. This process uses sunlight to make food. Oxygen also makes its way into water from the surrounding air.
 
You will find certain fish in certain bodies of water based on what kind of food is there. It is based on the amount and type of food available in a setting. All fish need to eat, so the amount of competition with other fish is a factor that determines which fish will be in certain areas. 
 
Fish prefer different water temperatures. Some fish are flexible. They have the ability to live in a wide range of temperatures. Other fish, however, need either cold or warm water to survive. Trout is an example of this. You will only find trout in cold water. Your best bet for finding a certain type of fish is to learn about the type of water it prefers. They are most often found in water that is close to their preferred temperature.

We, as humans, can control one factor when it comes to where fish live. Water quality often determines where a fish will live and we have the means to ensure a high level of water quality. All fish must have water that has adequate levels of oxygen. Good-quality water will obviously support more species of fish than water that is polluted. Water that is stagnant, polluted, or lacking adequate oxygen simply cannot support a large group of fish. While some fish, such as carp, live in water that is not very clean, most fish need a high quality of water in order to survive. 
 
Discovering the places where fish live is the first step to successful fishing. Several factors come into play when looking for a fish's habitat. Some of these are the levels of salt and oxygen found in water. Another factor is the temperature of the water. All fish are different. Because of this, it benefits you, the angler, to take the time necessary to find the bodies of water in which they live.
 

It’s great to fish in the summer when the air is warm and the lake is calm. There are fishermen, though, who can’t wait for winter and the lake to freeze solid. Ice fishing is a sport that many people enjoy, extending the fishing season to year-round pleasure. What’s more, ice fishing is a great family activity.

What makes ice fishing so appealing to families is that the sport isn’t just about catching fish. Getting outdoors and breathing crisp, good air while having fun sums up ice fishing well. Smiles, laughs, and playing in the snow are all pretty common occurrences while out on the ice. Those reasons are just some of the few that even people who hate fishing get hooked on this winter activity. If you’d like to try a day of ice fishing with your family, here are some things to keep in mind.

Ice fishing is usually a whole-day activity. Get out on the ice early after breakfast to enjoy the best hours. If you plan on bringing home a bunch of perch for a meal, then being ready with your lines in the water by the time the sun starts to rise is best. Fish tend to bite in the early morning or later in the afternoon, depending on the species. The period in between usually ends up being playtime for families rather than hours spent reeling up the fish.

Pack a good lunch and some snacks, because the fresh air and activity will stir appetites. Lots of finger foods and plenty of water to drink serve the purpose nicely. It’s a good idea to avoid bringing beer with you, though, as alcohol and cold don’t mix well. Alcohol can lower your body temperature and the chill in the air makes it harder to feel the effects You may end up going overboard without realizing you’ve had one to many to make the safe drive home.

Staying warm while ice fishing is a must. The open-air location will often carry a good breeze, so windproof clothing should be your first consideration. Plenty of layers underneath warm sweaters will trap the heat and keep you feeling toasty. Good boots and mitts of solid construction are best, and even better are those that are waterproof. Ice fishing involves playing in cold water, after all!

Some other accessories you’ll need are a warm hat and sunglasses. Bright sunlight reflects on the white snow and ice, which can be brutal on your eyesight and vision. Many ice anglers who don’t wear sunglasses come home and realize they can’t see well for over half an hour! Since the sun is so strong and the reflection off the snow amplifies its effects, it’s also easy to get sunburned, so apply plenty of sun block to avoid red cheeks.

If you’re new to ice fishing, choose an outfitter that will provide you with a cabin, a stove, lines, minnows and a hole-drilling service. These outfitters want to make sure you enjoy your day as much as possible and will set you up with everything you need for hours of fun. The employees will also be more than happy to answer your questions and give you tips on how to fish.

Once you’re set up, respect other people around you. Have a good time, but don’t blast a radio to upset the peace and quiet of other anglers. Don’t throw waste on the ice either and have a care for the environment. Some fishermen pour antifreeze in their holes to prevent ice from forming but antifreeze is toxic and this practice is an irresponsible one. Use the metal spoon provided to keep your holes from freezing over.

In addition, if you aren’t going to eat the fish you catch, handle them gently and practice catch and release. The growth rate and reproduction of fish is quite slow, which means negligent or abusive behaviour can put a dent in fish populations.

Lastly, pack up and head home before you get tired. Being outside for a few hours in cold temperatures will hit you hard once you get into a warm car. By the time you get home, you’ll probably feel exhausted. After a day of ice fishing, ordering a pizza for supper can be a godsend!

Loving the Ling: A Tribute to the Ugliest Fish in the Sea

The ling or “eelpout” is without a doubt a disgusting, repulsive, annoying, slimy, smelly and unattractive fish in the sea. Despite these negative qualities, it has a delicious lobster-like taste and boasts its own annual festival near Walker, Minnesota. Why? The eelpout may be ugly, but its redeeming qualities far outweigh any appearance deficiencies.

Eelpout, also known as spineless catfish, lawyer or burbot, tend to reside mostly in the deeper waters of clean cold Northern lakes. Their appearance is part eel, part catfish, sporting one single chin whisker known as a barbel. Its physique is lean and mean with considerable strength, challenging anglers with an audacious game of hide-and-seek. Its primary draw for many anglers is the ease with which they are caught. During the winter months, eelpout relocate into water 25 to 50 feet deep for spawning. As a result, anglers can expect to catch large numbers of these homely swimmers, often weighing in the double digits.

Early evening and after dark are prime times for successful eelpouting. These ugly creatures of the deep are known carnivores; if it’s fishy and fits in their mouths, they will eat it. While this makes baiting them somewhat easier, it is this trait which also makes them an unwelcome guest to other anglers, as they tend to steal bait. Like other nocturnal creatures, eelpout prefer to sneak up on their victims while they rest.

The strength, depth and aggressiveness of this species require stronger equipment than most game fishing. Stronger lure combined with leaders of at least three feet and a swivel will keep the catch online and prevent lure from twisting with the fish. Glow hooks and rattle spoons with minnows top off the lure, which is then allowed to free-call to the bottom. The lure mingles with the muck and is then snapped back to the surface, at which point an eelpout may already be on board. During the spawning period in late February, a catch of 100 or more is not uncommon, weighing on average between 3 and 8 pounds.

Those who love the ling are welcome to pay its tribute at the annual International Eelpout Festival on Leech Lake in Walker, Minnesota. Three full days commemorating the ugliest fish in the sea begin with an Opening Ceremony, complete with Torch Lighting. Entrants are encouraged to use their imagination when constructing their fishing shelter, as prizes are awarded for the most lavish structure built on the lake. Extra points may be earned if the shelter sports a logo from one of the sponsoring companies of the tournament. Prizes are also awarded for the single pout with the most weight, for the most combined pout tonnage by a single angler and for most combined pout tonnage by a team of anglers.

If actually catching these despicable creatures is not on your agenda, the Festival offers numerous activities to help celebrate the eelpout in style. The Eelpout Peelout is a 5K run which challenges its contestants to be the first to win the race and win the angling contest. The Snowmobile Radar Run, Eelpout Bowl Rugby Tournament, the Polar Plunge, a black-tie dinner on the ice and an “On-Ice” Auto Race ensure there is something fun for participants of all ages, whether an angler or spectator.

Few creatures are as unappealing, yet offer so much in the spirit of fishing. There is nothing refined or fancy about fishing for eelpout; it is simply fun. For those who like to fish, enjoy the outdoors, and catch a lot of fish without regard to species, the eelpout is a beautiful thing indeed.

Lure Terminology

There are many ways to lure in fish to your boat. Words like rigging, chumming, and luring come to mind. However, there are many varieties when it comes to lures and trying to decipher between all of them can be a confusing process. In addition, knowing when to “chum” as oppose to “lure” can be equally challenging when you are ready to catch the most fish that you can.

When deciding whether you should lure or chum, you should be aware of what type of fish you are trying to catch. Chum is a mess to make, distribute and to store so be sure that you are using it for the right reasons. Lures are used the majority of the time, but if you are dealing with fish who heavily use their sense of smell, lures may be a waste of time. As a general rule of thumb, chum is used in order to bring fish to the boat and lures are generally used for spot fishing.

When you decide to use a lure, what type do you choose? There are many different kinds of lures and they are used in different regions for a variety of purposes. If you learn the basics then you will not have to look like a novice by reading the back of the package will perusing the aisles in the stores.

A lure is defined as an object, often designed to resemble a fish’s prey, and they usually come equipped with one or more hooks that are used to catch fish. You will attach a lure to the end of your fishing line and throw it out into the water until a fish takes a bite. The one exception to the rule is the fly lure, which is used to float on the water’s surface mimicking the movement of an insect. You can also troll lure behind a boat to create the appearance of a living animal in the water. Some of the different types of lures are classified as jigs, wobblers, spinner, spoon lures, plugs, fly lures, and worms.

Jigs are made of weighted metal heads and a tail that is made from animal hair, soft plastic, feathers, or rubber. A minnow can sometimes to be added or a piece of meat can be attached to the end of the hook. Jigs can be used for almost any kind of saltwater or freshwater fishing.

A spoon is a metal lure that looks similar to a bait fish. These lures are meant to be cast or to be trolled behind a moving vessel. The plastic belts are the most commonly thought of baits. They are the plastic worms that are sometimes scented in order to attract more fish. The plastic belts can be used with or without a weight, but a jig head, spinner, or a spinner bait always accompanies them.

Plugs are made from plastic or wood and can be used on top of the water. There is a separate category of plugs called diving plugs that are designed to plunge into a certain depth of the water.

The spinners have blades that spin around a wire shaft, and they are made of plastic or animal hair. The spinner baits are the lures with more than one blade that spin around a safety shaft. They are characterized by ‘skirts’, which are made of animal hair, vinyl, rubber, and other materials.

Lastly are the poppers and flies. These baits are primarily used for panfish, trout, and bass. Fly-tying is a harder concept to learn, making these lures unique.

Lures are tested and decided upon by the individual. Many lures are determined to be useful by trying them out time and time again. When you become comfortable with a certain type of lure, you will be able to expand on its possibilities, making it more individualized for your fishing purposes.

Blue Marlin Fishing

Marlins are characterized as big game saltwater fish. The average weight of a blue marlin is anywhere from one hundred to five hundred pounds. Their bodies can reach the length of ten feet and they are mainly found in the Pacific, Indian, and Atlantic Oceans. The blue marlin is known for its ability to fight, so you must be willing to match the marlin’s will to live in order to take the sport seriously. Just like any other fish, the importance of learning the habits of the blue marlin is essential before trying to make them submissive to a hook.

When marlin are in their primitive habitat they will feed on many things including mullet, cero, whole ballyhoo, dolphin, flying fish, bonito, skipjacks, squid and Spanish mackerel. The reason for understanding the marlin’s eating habits is to know what bait will be useful to catch these mammoth fish. Any combination of the aforementioned fish will be more than sufficient bait when trying to catch your marlin.

A simple technique used in marlin fishing is the lure of the “bonito” bait. You take the bonito and hook it through the tops of their eye sockets. The bonito will stay alive for hours, making your job more about patience.

Make sure that you have half of the line on your reel because marlin have a stubborn streak and they will try to fight you until you are tired or are dragged under by the weight and persistence. Wheel in your line consistently after the marlin first takes a bite of the bait. If your line seems to be too tight, loosen up the slack in order to give the marlin a little more room. This technique will also allow you to take a small break here and there. Loosening your line will also decrease the chance that the line will break, which is a common cause of anglers losing their game.

Another traditional method for finding marlin is the study of their behavior. Marlin will usually follow schools of fish. They will also be more susceptible to trolling. Trolling is simple enough if you employ logic when you use the method. For instance, if you spot a marlin following a school of fish, do not drop your bait in front of the fish because they will scatter and scare the marlin. If the sun is positioned in front of the marlin, he will be oblivious to your bait because he will be unable to see it.

The best way to find marlin is through the use of modern technology. An ultrasound sensor is a tool that is used to spot marlin. However, the gadgets for fishing are not cheap. Unless you are someone who is dedicated to solely fishing for marlin, be careful of the purchases that you make. Often times companies will make products that are specifically designed for a certain type of fishing, in a certain location, or even a region. Make sure that you do your research before you buy any electronic fishing tool.

The one thing to keep in mind about marlin is their will to survive. A fight with a marlin could last for hours without the slightest bit of relief. If at any time you feel like you are becoming exhausted and the fish is still going strong, cut the line. If you land a blue marlin you will feel an exhilarating sense of accomplishment, but there is no achievement that should allow you to put yourself in danger at any time. Marlin fishing should be a hobby, but it is a hobby that should be approached with intelligence. You should always know the strength of your opponent before you take the challenge of a fight. The marlin is a beautiful fish, that if you become good enough, can make you a lot of money, but it will take a will that matches the fish to beat the fish.

Night Fishing

Night fishing is a little harder than fishing when the sun is bright. However, it is common throughout the reservoirs of the south and southeast when the summer months are too uncomfortable to fish for an entire day. The water will usually be so warm that the fish will go deeper and deeper from the surface to find more oxygen, making them harder to catch. Many people night fish as a hobby, but it is important to take extra safety precautions and to be prepared for anything.

Generally, bass fishing is the most common type of night fishing. Since bass are slow moving and they do not migrate long distances, you should be able to locate them at the same locations during many parts of the day. If you have a certain fishing spot, they should still be there at night as well. The fish will also find spots near manufactured structures and anywhere that crawfish may be in abundance.

Typically, you will want to use a heavier tackle at night than you would during the day. Since sight is limited, you will have to rely on the feel of the lure to determine whether you have a bite. Some of the lures that have been proven to give results are hair jigs, pork rinds, and rubber jigs.

When you are preparing for your night trip, you need to take some extra measures that you may not necessarily think about for a day trip. You should check the weather beforehand. When visibility is limited, you do not want to be caught in rain or deep fog. You also need to make sure that your boat is in working order. The last thing that you will want is to break down at night.

You should be well aware of what you have and do not have in your tackle and toolboxes. Light sources are obviously very important to night fishing. Many anglers will use “black lights” and some sort of fluorescent line. When the line is under the black light, it will have a neon glow and make subtle movements more visible. At the very least, you should have extra flashlights and a mounted light on your boat. You want to keep yourself safe and visible to other boats that may be night fishing at the same time.

Bass fish do not have great vision, so they will rely on their sense of smell during the night. Your objective is to create a smell of food or wounded prey. A popular method during night fishing is to create a chum line. If you are not comfortable trolling a chum line, you may want to consider live bait. Be prepared that some larger species of fish are going to be looking for a free meal as well.

Another thing you cannot forget when you go out for any fishing trip is a first aid kit. If for some reason you so much as cut your finger, you will need to have supplies ready and in reach. You need to wear your life jacket at all times when you are fishing at night. Don’t forget your insect repellent because mosquitoes are looking for a free meal, too.

“Noodling”: Cooking Pasta or Catching Catfish?

“Noodling” conjures up images of standing over a vat of boiling water, cooking some kind of Italian pasta to perfection. This may be one definition of the term, but in reference to one of the oddest fishing styles known, it refers to the art of fishing for catfish using only bare hands and a big stick for prodding purposes. That is correct; using only your bare hands to feel your way along the mud-caked bottom of a river in search of a catfish is called noodling. Better still, these catfish can weigh an awful lot.

Noodling, also referred to as grabbling, is legal only in certain states and was practiced by Native Americans long before the settlement of Europeans. To experience noodling you must plan a trip south to Arkansas, North Carolina or Mississippi. During the Depression, it was rumored grabbling became popular as a rapid and inexpensive manner of providing food for the family. Today, grabbling as a means of fishing for flathead, channel and blue catfish is mainly for entertainment, as most grabblers practice catch-and-release.

From late May to

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