How To Tie A Tie - Learn How With Most Wonderful Collection Popular And Stylish With 18 Necktie

Best Beautiful Collection and Stylish 18 Different Ways To Tie A Tie Knot Step By Step:

Want to signal power? What about trust in a business relationship? Or casual approachability? One subconscious signal can give this. The tie knot. Why? It’s a subliminal message that speaks to our attention to detail. Don’t believe me? Look at nearly every President. The full Windsor knot. Look at less formal business outfits. The four-in-hand or half Windsor knot. Each style sends a different message and suits a different shirt collar and neck. There are tie knots for tall guys, short guys, big guys, and skinny guys. Yet most men use one tie knot their entire lives.

1. The Simple Knot (Oriental Knot)

Easy to make, relatively small and quite versatile?

Not only does it have all 3 qualities, but it can also save you precious time.

If you do not go to a place that requires a super well-dressed set, this knot is the way to go.

The oriental knot is easy to tie, it requires a relatively small amount of tie and creates an asymmetrical knot. When tightened, it may seem a bit small, so it is more suitable for men with narrow faces and small necks. It is more appropriate for informal and social business events.

Oriental knot summary
Knot Size: Small
Difficulty level: easy
Formality: informal business, social
Recommended necklaces: pointed necklaces, smaller necklaces

Description of the eastern knot
The eastern knot is also known as the simple knot, and for good reason. It is easy to tie and requires only a relatively small amount of length (or material). You can do it in less than a minute without losing your rhythm.

As you will see in the steps below, only 1 horizontal twist should be performed using the thick end of the tie. No extravagant or confusing movements. And guess what? It is a style that is good enough for informal, social or business occasions.

Although it is simple to do, this knot is not well known in the West. It is popular in Asia (particularly in China), and one of the reasons for this could be the way in which the West is accustomed to the four-handed knots and Windsor, which "free themselves." Those knots can be untangled with a single pull on the tie. That is the disadvantage of the eastern knot.

Another thing to keep in mind is that this knot is asymmetrical, designed to lean towards the active end of the tie. And since it is a compact size, it may seem quite small when squeezed. But that is exactly what makes it the perfect knot for men with narrow faces and taller men who need a little more length. It works best specifically with thick ties.

A note about the length of the loop
In the 1930s, the ties were very short: they stopped at the navel or did not reach the waist. Ties these days are usually knotted for longer but remember not to go beyond the waist, since you want your face to stand out.


Your face, not the torso, should be "framed" by the tie in the best possible way. Only the top of the tie should be seen. This is especially important when wearing a jacket. If your tie peaks below the button point, it will look strange. You will end up losing a couple of elegant points.

How To Tie Oriental Knot - Step by Step In 8 Steps

  1. Place the tie around your neck with the seam inward and the thick end to your left, two or three inches below the desired finishing position.
  2. Bring the thick end horizontally across the front of the narrow end, and then pass it horizontally behind the narrow end.
  3. Pass the thick end again through the front of the knot from left to right.
  4. Now pass the thick end again behind the knot horizontally from right to left.
  5. Pass the thick end AGAIN through the front of the knot from left to right. Slide one finger under this third horizontal loop.
  6. Wear the tip of the thick end under the loop around your collar and feed it behind the knot, down over the front of the knot and through that third horizontal loop.
  7. Pull the thick end through the horizontal loop and adjust it.
  8. Adjust the tie by holding the knot with one hand and gently pulling the narrow end with the other.

Congratulations! You have just completed your own eastern knot. It is a simple and reliable option for men who like a smaller structured tie knot. You can count on it to work incredibly well for social and informal business events.

2. Four In Hand Knot

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How to tie a four knot in your hand - Easily tie four knots in your hand
The four knots in the hand.

It is the first knot you must learn.

And it is the most popular tie knot.

Why?

Because it is simple

And it's easy.

So, do you know how to tie it? Today I am going to show you how with our comprehensive guide of the Four in Hand Knot. I will also show you the history of the tie and show you where it got the unusual name Four In Hand Knot.

Summary of the Four In Hand Knot
Small size
Symmetry: no
Difficulty: easy
Formality: appropriate business
Recommended collars: pointed collars, buttoned collar

The history of the tie
Let's start with some history. No one is sure why the ties started. It is possible that the tie began as an extension of tribal accounts that were believed to provide protection against the disease.

These accounts later evolved in neck scarves that have been found molded on terracotta soldiers in ancient Chinese tombs.

Later, the Roman legions used ribbons called calcium tied around their necks to help identify themselves in battle.

In the Roman Senate, speakers often tied strips of wool around their necks to warm their vocal cords before an important speech.

However, the decorative tie probably descends from the Croatian mercenaries.

In 1636, after the Croats helped Austria defeat Turkey, King Louis XIV invited these men to Paris to celebrate. While visiting France, the Croats tied colorful scarves around the neck and the trend continued.

Parisians referred to scarves as cravate, the French word for Croatian.

Four In Hand Knot - Description
The four-knot in the hand is probably the most popular tie knot today. It is also known as the "school knot" because it is simple, easy to master and is usually the knot we use first when we learn how to tie a tie. The four-knot in the hand is asymmetrical, narrow and best suited for wide shirts and smart casual events.

This knot derives its name from the four-horse carriage. The knot resembles the way in which the driver of the car would knot his reins thus keeping four horses in hand or four in hand. It was popularized by the Four In Hand driving club in London, founded in 1856 for the purpose of "recreational carriage driving." The Four In Hand Club no longer exists (there is no longer much demand for carriage driving), but this simple knot is still alive and is as popular as ever.

Four In Hand Knot: when to use
First, examine the collar of the dress shirt. A sign of a truly well-dressed gentleman is that he knows how to combine his tie knot with his neck style.

Are the points narrow or generalized? The Four In Hand knot works well with narrow and extended necklaces, those with collar tips that have an angle of 60 degrees or less. Button collars also work well with all four in hand. If the extension of the collar is wider, a knot like the Windsor medium, the Double Windsor or the Shelby can serve better.

Now, examine the proportions of your face and neck. A gentleman with a wide combination of face and neck should opt against the small knot of the Four In Hand due to its smaller knot size. On the other hand, a man with a narrow face or neck will find that the Four In Hand tie knot flatters its proportions very well.

Finally, the tie style must be taken into account. Traditional patterns, such as sticks or stripes, can be best seen with the Four In Hand knot. In addition, thinner ties use the four-knot in the hand better. Thicker ties, such as Italian silk ones, look best with a wide triangular knot like Full Windsor.

How To Tie Four In Hand Knot - Step By Step in 7 Steps

  1. With the neck raised, wrap the tie around the neck so that the thick end hangs to the left. It must be 3 or 4 inches lower than the thin end.
  2. Cross the thick end over the thin end to form an 'X' shape.
  3. Take the thick end and wrap it around and behind the thin end. The thick end should now be upside down.
  4. Bring the thick end around and in front of the knot from left to right.
  5. Holding the thin end with one hand, pull the thick end up through the neck.
  6. Pass the thick end through the tie knot.
  7. Pull the thick end to achieve the desired knot size.

Additional tip: between steps 6 and 7 create a dimple under the knot in your tie by gently pressing with your index finger. Pinch the sides of the knot with your thumb and middle finger and squeeze them while pulling the knot tightly. The dimple creates an appearance of sophistication that ends the overall portrait of his tie.

If you have done this right, the end of your tie should protrude from the belt and end in the middle of the belt buckle.

The four-knot in the hand is the easiest knot to learn and is appropriate for most occasions.

3. Half Windsor Knot


How to tie the Half Windsor knot - Tie the knots of the Half Windsor tie
The Half Windsor knot: considered one of the most popular tie knots in use.

It is symmetrical, balanced and appropriate for most professional occasions.

Today, we will learn how to tie the Half Windsor knot and make it part of your style.

The Half Windsor knot is medium in size, symmetrically and works well with a medium extended collar.

Half Windsor knot - History
The Half Windsor knot was possibly created as an attempt to simplify the steps of the Windsor knot. The Half-Windsor gained prominence in the gray business suits of the 1950s. It is probably due to the fact that the crisp and clean focal point that created the knot gave it an air of power in the office.

Half Windsor Knot - Description
If you just start learning to tie a tie, the Half Windsor knot should be one of your first knots. It is a little more complicated than the knot of four in the hand, but it is still easy to master. Remember, practice makes perfect!

In The 85 Ways to Tie a Tie by Thomas Fink and Yong Mao, Half-Windsor is known as the numbers seven (Li Ro Ci Lo Ri Co T) and eight (Li Ro Ci Ro Li Co T). The Half-Windsor creates a symmetrical triangular knot of moderate size. It is larger than the four available but smaller than the full Windsor.

Despite the inappropriate name, the Half Windsor is not half the size of the full Windsor.
Rather it is about 75% of the size. This makes it a better proportional option for taller men since it uses less tie than the Windsor.

Due to the smaller size of the knot, the Half Windsor not only works well with medium-sized necklaces but also with pointed necklaces and button-shaped necklaces.

How To Tie Half Windsor knot - Step by step in 8 Steps

  1. Place the tie on your neck and adjust it until the wide end is longer than the narrow end
  2. Cross the wide end of the tie over the narrow end
  3. Bring the wide end around and behind the narrow end
  4. Take the wide end over and through the opening near your neck
  5. Wrap the wide end through the front of the thin end
  6. Pull the wide end under and through the neck opening
  7. Pull the wide end of the knot through the loop formed in the front
  8. Finally, tighten the knot by pulling the wide end while holding the knot until you are satisfied with the appearance

You can carry the knot up to the neck by holding the narrow end of the tie while pushing the knot with the other hand. Finally, keep your tie looking tight by placing the narrow end through the safety tie on the back of the tie.

Your tie should rest between the top and middle of your belt line. If it is too short, start again making the narrow end higher. If it is too long, start with the narrowest low end.

The Half Windsor knot is a classic tie knot that will work for any formal occasion. It should be your next step after the Four In Hand knot before learning the full Windsor knot.

4. Full Windsor Knot

How to tie the full Windsor knot | Tie the double Windsor tie
The complete Windsor knot.

A knot with pedigree.

It is a large knot with an asymmetrical shape.

And complements an extended or cut neck.

It is often confused with being difficult to tie, but this is not true. Today we will learn to tie the full Windsor knot.

The Full Windsor knot - History
The Windsor knot is sometimes referred to as a full Windsor knot or double Windsor knot. This is to distinguish it from the small Half Windsor knot. It is the largest of the four most popular tie knots.

The Full Windsor knot creates a comfortable space between the neck and neck while holding the tie in place.

Starting from the royal heritage of the English, this knot enjoys great prestige when used. Therefore, it is largely a knot of power for business.

The Duke of Windsor, Prince Edward, never used the Windsor knot. He was in favor of a large triangular knot of four in hand with an extra thick tie. The Windsor knot was an imitation of the public to achieve its trend-setting style, even with an ordinary tie. It is believed that the Duke's father, George V, invented the Windsor knot.

The Windsor knot also involves a bit of controversy. In the 20s and 30s, the United States fell deeply in love with all the fashionable things that the Duke did (at that time, Prince Edward). In a demonstration of how to tie a Windsor knot in the United States in 1936, two steps were reversed. This created an impossibly complex knot.

No one knows if this was a hoax or an honest mistake. But it has led to the mistaken belief that learning to tie a Windsor knot is extremely difficult. However, our guide below shows that this is not true.

The Full Windsor Knot - Description
The Full Windsor is a very large triangular symmetric knot. While the knot is released automatically, it does not slip when it is tied correctly. The ties that form the back of the knot allow some space between the neckline and the tie, which makes the Windsor very comfortable to wear.

A properly tied Full Windsor offers the following advantages:

Create a firm knot with an asymmetrical shape.
It has a very large triangle that complements an extended or cut collar.
A large and thick knot like the Full Windsor can distract attention from the user's face, better complement a strong square or round face, or one with facial hair.
For correct use, the tie must be at least 4 centimeters (approximately 1.6 inches) longer than a conventional tie.
The thick knot in the neck of a full Windsor uses a lot of cloth. Wear a classic long silk tie to tie it. Avoid tweed or knit ties as they will be too bulky for this knot.
Full Windsor knots go best in highly formal events, such as weddings or business meetings with very important or powerful people.
This should be the ideal knot for men who are sturdy or have wider necks. The Windsor will look properly proportional to its face and constitution.
Use darker tones and more spaced patterns with this knot. The Windsor can seem overwhelming when the tie has bright or striking patterns.
As the full Windsor is bigger, it also seems very formal.
Wear the Windsor every time you have a tie with many free lengths and want a thick, full-bodied knot.
The shape of the Full Windsor is the same as that of the Half Windsor but is 25% larger than the Half Windsor knot.

How To Tie The Full Windsor knot - Step by step in 11 Steps

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Follow the 11 steps below and, with some practice, you will tie the classic Full Windsor or Double Windsor Knot knot in less than two minutes!

  1. Place the tie around your neck with the wide end to the right hanging 4-6 inches lower than your waist.
  2. Cross the wide end horizontally in front of the thin end, forming an X just below the chin.
  3. Tuck the wide end up and under the loop around your neck, rising up behind the X. Use a finger to hold the X in place.
  4. Pull the wide end all the way.
  5. Bring the wide end around the knot and pass it horizontally from right to left.
  6. Turn the tip of the wide end up and pull it diagonally across the front of the knot.
  7. Pass the wide end over the top of the loop around your collar and lower it again. It should emerge to the left of the thin end.
  8. Bring the wide end horizontally across the front of the knot, from left to right. This forms a horizontal band. Stick a finger and hold it in place.
  9. Wear the wide end under the loop once more, around the collar with the tip pointing up.
  10. Turn the wide end down and slide the tip through the horizontal loop you saved with your finger in step 8.
  11. Pull the wide end completely down and smooth any crease or slack in the knot.

Because the Full Windsor is at the largest end of the tie knots, it has a classic feel and shows that you know your business. Use this knot if you want to project an image of power, trust, and authority.

5. Nicky Knot

How to tie Nicky's knot
Nicky's knot.

Have you heard of this?

It's something like an underrated knot.

And it is rarely mentioned or talked about.

But despite its relative darkness, Nicky Knot is actually a versatile tie knot that can play a number of roles. It may not be the only tie knot that a man needs to know, but it is certainly on the list of good guys to practice.

And today, we'll show you how to tie Nicky's knot.

Nicky Knot History and Description
The name "Nicky" supposedly comes from Nikita Kruschev's visit to Milan, where "inside out" knots like Nicky and the Pratt knot were commonly used in shop windows and tailors.

A Nicky knot uses a relatively small amount of length. This makes it a good choice for tall men or men with ties that are a touch on the short side.

It is a little thicker than the knot of four in the hand. And Nicky's Knot has a symmetrical appearance (although in mathematical terms it is not, technically, asymmetric knot, since it has more "movements" on one side than on the other).

In size, the Nicky falls between the four in the hand and the middle Windsor. It can be particularly useful for men who wear thin knitted ties: a four-handed knot tied with a thin tie is so small that it seems absurd. The smallest structure of Nicky Knot can be hidden even under a thin band of fabric while providing a good strong knot in a knitted tie.

How To Tie Nicky Knot - Step by Step in 8 Steps

  1. Wrap the tie around your neck with the seam facing out and the thick end to your left. It should be approximately two inches lower than the final position desires.
  2. Cross the thick end under the thin end, forming an X under the chin.
  3. Turn the thick end up in front of the loop around your collar. Then put it down through the loop, emerging to the left of the thin end.
  4. Bring the tip of the thick end horizontally across the front of the knot. Slide one finger under the horizontal band you just created at the front of the knot.
  5. Bring the tip of the thick end up and under the loop around your collar.
  6. Tuck the tip of the thick end down through the horizontal loop that you created in Step 4.
  7. Pull the thick end all the way through the horizontal loop and adjust it.
  8. Adjust the knot as necessary by holding it with one hand and pulling the narrow end of the tie with the other.

6. Bow Tie Knot

How to tie a bow tie: self-adjusting bow tie knots in 10 steps
Want to know how to tie a bow tie?

Can you tie shoelaces?

Great, then you know how to tie a bow tie!

A black bow tie is a symbol of formality.

And it is the most elegant knot suitable for a black-tie event.

Despite what you may think, the bowtie is not a difficult knot to learn.

Bow ties are simple, functional and, when used correctly, can attract positive attention to the user.

Many of you already use them. How can I know? Dozens of men like you have emailed me their stories about how bow ties make patients open to doctors, women smile and talk about how their parents used them and, in general, create a characteristic look that guarantees that remember it.

But despite all the positive features of the bow ties, many men still have questions.

How big should they be? What width What style? The best way to tie one? Well, we are here to help.

Bow tie: when and how to use it
When combined with a custom dress shirt, the bow tie attracts attention and conveys a sense of individuality. Just look at some of the most important figures in history: Winston Churchill, Fred Astaire, and Charlie Chaplin. Each of these men cut a rushed figure by wearing their ties with pride.

Unfortunately, even on television, the only place where we seem to see a bow tie is in Harry Crane of Mad Men.

In general, the bow tie has been regulated to formal events where it is often a pre-tied clip. This preformed tie is quite convenient, however, it lacks the personal style and touch that can be added when tying your own bow tie.

A bow tie is part of the dress code required for formal white tie and black tie events and is also the preferred accessory for men in the informal business looking to bring their outfit to life. Your bow tie should be the size of your collar size.

Formal events require a dress shirt with necklaces on the wings, while separate collars are suitable for the formal-informal business and dress code. The length of the bow tie is important.

For adjustable bow ties, insert the hook into the slot that corresponds to the size of your neck.

How To Tie a Bow Tie - Step By Step in 10 Steps

  1. Place the bowtie around your neck, with the seams facing down, with the right end longer than the left.
  2. Place the longest right end of the bowtie over the shorter left end, forming an X.
  3. Roll the longest end behind the "X" and pull it hard: a bowtie knot cannot be tightened around your neck after trying it. Leave the longest end on your shoulder.
  4. Fold the shorter end to the right and to the left to create an arc shape.
  5. Holding the bow, lower the longest end through the center of the bow.
  6. Bend the longer end towards the chest and pinch the crease.
  7. Push it through the loop behind the shorter end to create two wings.
  8. Pull the bow ties behind the wings to tighten.
  9. Adjust the bowtie until the bow is symmetrical.
  10. Make final adjustments. Make sure your bowtie is flat and horizontal.

To undo, simply pull the loose ends on each side and untangle the knot.

The shape of the finished knot will vary according to the tie style. Make this slight variation in Step 4 for these bow tie styles:

Butterfly shape: the classic style of the butterfly shape should have wide ends and a small knot in the center. Fold a butterfly bow tie at the widest part of the curve.

Batwing or Straight End: a batwing or straight end will be only slightly wider at the tips than at the center. Fold at the point just before the shape begins to decrease.

Pointed: the two ends are forced to protrude beyond the straight edges of the loop. Also, fold a bow tie with a pointed tip in the widest part of the curve and pay attention to the two sets of wings that must be aligned with enough precision to create the right effect.

7. Kelvin Knot


Tired of same old tie knot?

I know it feels dull sometimes…

But what are the options?

Not all knots go well with your face…

some make your head look small…

Thankfully, there’s the Kelvin Knot.

The Kelvin Knot is easy to learn and appropriate for business environments and social events. It's best used with point collars and button-down collars and is most compatible with men who have smaller faces.

Kelvin Knot – History and Description
The Kelvin is a small knot similar to the four-in-hand knot, with an extra turn to make it symmetrical. The knot is tied “inside-out,” with the seam facing outward as it drapes around the collar. When finished, the thick end of the tie, the knot, and the shirt collar hide the seam from view.
The Kelvin knot is named for William Thompson, Lord Kelvin, the nineteenth-century scientist best known for his work in thermodynamics. The knot is a more modern invention, and would never have been worn by Lord Kelvin; it was named in honor of his contributions to early mathematical knot theory.

As a smaller knot, the Kelvin works well when you have the little spare length to work with, and may need a thicker tie to bulk it up. Tied in a very light and narrow tie it can tighten down until it appears very small, making the wearer’s head appear unattractively large.

Use the Kelvin for a quick, casual necktie knot with a little more symmetry than the angular four-in-hand.

How To Tie A Kelvin Knot - Step By Step in 8 Steps

  1. Drape the necktie around your collar with the seam facing outward and the thick end on your left, hanging two to three inches lower than the desired finishing position.
  2. Cross the thick end under the thin end from left to right, creating an X-shape under your chin.
  3. Bring the thick end back across the front of the knot from right to left. Continue wrapping it around the thin end and pass it back from left to right behind the knot.
  4. Next, bring the thick end horizontally across the front of the knot from right to left again. Slip a finger underneath the horizontal band this creates.
  5. Tuck the thick end upward underneath the loop around your collar.
  6. Bring the tip of the thick end down through the horizontal loop you created in Step 4 (but not the smaller one you created in Step 3).
  7. Pull the thick end all the way through the horizontal loop, snugging the knot down into place.
  8. Tighten the tie by grasping the knot with one hand and pulling gently on the narrow end with the other.

Great job! Now you know how to tie the Kelvin Knot. It's time to learn new knots for different occasions and shirt styles.

8. Pratt Knot

The Pratt knot.

Ever heard of it?

Nope – it’s not named after the guy in Guardians of the Galaxy.

It’s a century-old necktie knot which is great for formal/semi-formal wear. And the best part? It has all the words most tie-wearers want to hear – it's simple, convenient, stylish and easy to make.

Summary Of The Pratt knot:
Recommended collars: Narrow point collars, button-down collars
Formality: Business-casual or social
Level of difficulty: Easy
Symmetry: Yes
Size of the knot: Medium (relatively small)

Pratt Knot – History
The Pratt knot has an interesting history.

A former US Chamber of Commerce employee named Jerry Pratt was supposedly the “inventor” – but it became popular thanks to news anchor Don Shelby (who some people believe deserves credit for it). That’s why this knot is also called the Pratt-Shelby.

It all started when the 92-year-old Pratt came to Shelby’s telecast one day. He refused to leave until he was able to fix Shelby’s tie. Changing it up – he amazed Shelby with how easily he could form the tie’s dimple without any fuss.

So Shelby wore it on-air – catching the attention of New York fashion writers at the time. They covered it as a “new” knot. And from then on, the knot became a permanent part of Shelby’s broadcaster wardrobe.

But here’s the thing: the Pratt knot actually dates back to the early 20th century. It is said that tailors in Milan have used it since at least the 1920s. It was a quick way for them to tie neckties onto mannequins for display. Hence another term exists – the Milanese knot.

Pratt Knot – Description
The Pratt is a variation of the Windsor knot. It’s symmetrical and medium-sized – so people consider it a great alternative to the Small or Four-in-hand knot.

How exactly is it medium-sized? It’s pretty much right in between the Windsor and the Four-in-hand. It also uses less of the tie fabric than a full Windsor.

The Pratt is known as an easy knot to tie – requiring just a few turns or passings. And with the way it’s done, there’s enough heft for this style to work on a standard-width tie (of light cloth) or a thick-bodied tie (like a knit necktie).

Pratt Knot – When To Wear
Because of its similarities to the Windsor, the Pratt knot is appropriate for almost any semi-formal or formal event. Business functions, cocktails, weddings – you name it. So imagine how much of a lifesaver it becomes when you’re running late to those events… and you still need to dress up!

The Pratt works best for moderately sized faces. In fact, for some men – the Windsor actually dwarfs their faces but the Pratt knot complements their proportions.

Due to the Pratt Shelby’s size, it fits well with a button-down and spread collars. The knot doesn’t dominate these collar types as the Windsor would. In conclusion, the Pratt Shelby is a nice, classic necktie knot that would be wise for the stylish man to experiment with.

How To Tie Pratt Knot – Step By Step in 8 Step

  1. Drape the necktie around your collar with its seam facing outward and the thick end hanging on your left, 1-2 inches lower than the desired finishing spot.
  2. Cross the thick end underneath the thin end – forming an X-shape below your chin.
  3. Pass the thick end through the loop.
  4. Pull the thick end all the way down and flip the tip so that it’s pointing to your left.
  5. Bring the thick end horizontally across the front of the knot (from right to left). Tuck a finger behind the horizontal band you’ve just created.
  6. Slip the thick end up through the loop from underneath.
  7. Point the tip of the thick end downward – directly on top of the narrow end.
  8. Pull the thick end down through the horizontal band. Snug it firmly into place.

You can adjust the necktie by grasping the knot with one hand while pulling on the narrow end gently with the other.

The Pratt Knot – Additional Reminders
The Pratt is NOT a self-releasing knot. It should only be untied by pulling the thick end back out (in reverse of these steps).
Since the knot is naturally small and symmetrical, it’s more suitable for narrow point collars and casual button-downs. If the collar spread is too wide (or the tie isn’t tightened enough), part of the loop will get exposed – and so will the seam.

9. St. Andrew Knot

St Andrew Knot - How to tie a tie
If you think the tie keeps flying, then I have the perfect tie knot for you.

It is something you can use for your business meeting.

You can use it until the night with your wife.

You can take it to the bar while driving a car or watching a concert from afar.

Seriously, this tie knot is PERFECT for business and casual occasions.

And it's a draw that is really easy to ... well, tie.

Then I have a written tutorial for you.

St Andrew Knot summary
Knot size: medium and slightly narrow
Difficulty level: easy
Formality: business / professional or social
Recommended necklaces: knitted necklaces, button necklaces

St Andrew Knot - Description
That is what makes the San Andres knot useful. It is basically a medium knot that adapts to most types of faces and environments. Although the design is asymmetrical, it is even enough to seem almost symmetrical unless it is seen closely.

It is classified as a narrow knotted knot, but it is slightly larger than those belonging to the same category. That makes it a good option for men with rounder faces or wider shoulders, keeping things proportional.

The St Andrews knot is a very convenient knot with some volume.
You will not waste much time learning it or making the real knot.

The San Andres knot can be tied quickly (although not as fast as the smaller knots) and is automatically released, which means you can pull the tail to undo everything. It is something that men can comfortably wear on formal and informal occasions.

Take note: as it is not purely symmetric, others prefer the Windsor or Pratt (Shelby) knot. Therefore, if you meet someone important as a great customer or VIP, you should consider the risk of your tie looking a bit "careless" or distracting. Always remember the purpose of your style.

However, due to its size, the San Andres knot is the most convenient option. And it is still popular, especially in the United Kingdom.

How To Tie St. Andrew Knot - Step by Step in 9 Step

  1. Place the tie around your neck with the seam facing out and the thick end to your left, two or three inches lower than the desired finishing position.
  2. Cross the thick end horizontally below the thin end, forming an X under the chin.
  3. Bring the thick end horizontally across the front of the thin end.
  4. Continue rotating the thick end around the thin end, passing it horizontally behind the back of the thin end from left to right.
  5. Turn the thick end vertically up and over the front of the knot, then tuck it back behind the knot.
  6. Take the thick end to the left of the thick end.
  7. Bring the thick end through the front of the knot from left to right. This will form a horizontal band. Swipe a finger through it.
  8. Finally, place the thick end behind the knot and pass it through the horizontal loop you made in Step 7.
  9. Pull the thick end completely and tighten the knot by grasping it with one hand and carefully pulling the thick end with the other.

To release the knot, simply pull the narrow end up and out; The rest of the knot will crumble without him.

The St Andrew Knot is a good medium knot suitable for most faces and purposes.
While it is not very symmetrical, it is even enough to seem almost symmetrical unless it is seen closely.

Congratulations! You have a finished San Andres knot, which will surely be useful when you dress hurriedly or during those events where you will not need your tie all the time. Enjoy additional convenience while maintaining your crisp style.

Now that you have mastered the knot of St. Andrew, let me give you some "why" tips to wear your tie.

Tie Tip # 1 - Make your knot crunchy
Whether you are modeling your new St Andrew Knot or designing any other knot, it is important to keep your knot sharp, sharp and tidy.

Keep your knot crisp and clean: what is above has to be attractive and attractive, or nobody will want to see what is below.
When you talk with other people, whether at a business or informal event, your elegant tie knot will help you keep your appearance under control. With a well-groomed look and the confidence that it entails, you can deepen your conversations and connect more deeply with others.

Tie Tip # 2: Fix your tie to the correct length
Let's go from the tip of the iceberg to the bottom of the iceberg. In other words, let's talk about the end of your tie!

Your tie should fall between the middle of your belt and the top of your belt. Any place within that range leaves you looking neat and polished.

If your tie falls on your belt, it is too short! It is noticeably out of place and will probably attract a couple of unwanted looks. Or a couple of jokes at your expense.

If your tie falls under your belt, it's too long! Not only will your tie look uncomfortable, but you probably won't enjoy the tie swinging back and forth in your region under the belt while walking.

When your tie is the correct length, your tie will be complete from end to end. From knot to bottom.
That sense of completion will allow you to feel more completely united, which will give you greater comfort and confidence while interacting with your boss or socializing with your friends. Your San Andres knot needs a congregation, right?

In addition to the knot and length, there is something else that you should ALWAYS consider when wearing ties ...

Tie Tip # 3: Have your tie match the outfit ... and the occasion
You can have a perfectly crafted knot and an incredible tie length, but if your tie is NOT suitable for your outfit or occasion, you can also leave it at home.

Before combining your tie with your outfit, PLEASE be sure to combine your outfit for the occasion. If you go to an interview, think about a suit. If you go to a baby shower, think of pants and a button.

Now that you combined your outfit with the occasion, you MUST combine your tie with the outfit.

Color. Model. Cloth. Width.

When you combine your tie with your outfit, let your crispy knot and your well-fixed tie shine.
Also, you let your tie shine as an expression of your personality and your style.

There you have it, gentlemen.

Regardless of the tie you choose, always make your knot crispy, fix your tie with the correct length and make sure your tie matches the outfit and the occasion. With these three tips in mind, you will always look well-groomed, feel safe and adapt to any commercial or informal event you plan to attend next.

10. Balthus Knot

How to tie the Balthus knot
The Balthus knot.
An absolute tie knot monster.

It takes nine moves or "passes" to complete and has four "centers" (loops around the center body of the knot).

Are you ready to step forward to Full Windsor?

This knot is a great option if you want to highlight and send a strong message. Because of the many folds in this knot, you will need a tie that is at least 57 inches long, but preferably 59 inches.

Balthus knot summary:
Long size
Symmetry: yes
Difficulty: medium
Formality: fine social dress; too extravagant for the business dress
Recommended necklaces: separate necklaces, cut necklaces
Men who want the full Balthus effect should place their knot so that the bow under it is already near its full width. Needless to say, this is surprising and requires a very long tie that widens rapidly.

Balthus Knot - History
The Balthus was named by its inventor, an eccentric Polish-French painter. He claimed to have developed it out of boredom but did not use the knot regularly.

Sometimes known as "The complete Windsor's cousin," it requires a very long bond. In addition, the creator's intention was that the tie immediately below the knot be quite wide, more than most men wear their ties.

Balthus Knot - Description
This symmetrical and unorthodox tie knot is named after a Polish-French painter. It is said that he invented it out of boredom, but he never bothered to use it regularly. And that makes sense: it is a special type of knot that you only use occasionally.

Some call him "The Windsor Cousin Complete," but the process takes much longer (and patience). There are a total of 9 movements or "passes" to complete, as well as 4 loops around the center body of the knot. The draw used for this must be very long and widens rapidly. That is the key to the striking that is seen at the end.

Men who want the maximum effect of Balthus should learn to place the knot so that the bow underneath is already near its full width. The result: your tie becomes the centerpiece of your outfit. Get a perfect balance between its largest size and the elegant knot.

However, let me remind you that Balthus has certain limitations. The additional width does not make it a flattering option for narrow faces or torsos. It is also too flashy and extravagant for business settings.

Wait for your invitation to those fine dining dinners, theater and art events, or accommodated rooms. Those are the advantageous moments to use it.

How To Tie Balthus Knot - Step by Step in 11 Step

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  1. Place a long tie around your neck with the seam facing up and the thick end to your left. The thick end should hang at least halfway to the thigh and the thin end in the center of the chest.
  2. Cross the thin end over the thick one.
  3. Take the thick end forward, put it behind the thin end and cross behind it.
  4. Put the thick end back in front and loop over the thin end, this time on the left side of the forming knot.
  5. Tuck the thick end down and forward, ending behind the thin end and to the right.
  6. Turn the thick end up and make a loop over the center of the knot.
  7. Now bring the thick end down behind the knot, crossing from right to left.
  8. Bring the thick end horizontally across the front of the knot, crossing from left to right.
  9. Bring the thick end behind the knot and up. Leave a little slack in the horizontal pass you just made.
  10. Tuck the thick end through this horizontal step.
  11. Adjust by gently pulling down the thin end while adjusting the knot in place with the other hand. Ideally, the tie under the knot should be quite wide but still fall to the beltline.

Now you just need to remember these guidelines:
Adjust the knot further by gently pulling the thin end with one hand, while adjusting the knot in place with the other hand.
This knot style is based on width/thickness. You will know that he took it off if the tie creates an almost scarf appearance under the neck. If you are on the thin side, you will want to redo the process or use a different tie (otherwise, you will run the risk of looking uncomfortable).
Ideally, the tip of the tie should touch the line of your belt, as with all modern tie knots.

11. Hanover Knot

How to tie the knot of Hannover | Tie for business
"A tight tie is the first serious step in life."

Who said that?

Oscar Wilde - the late poet and playwright

(who wrote The Picture of Dorian Gray)

What does that tell us? It represents a series of truths.

Style matters as you grow
Ties are powerful accessories
Tying a tie is a valuable skill
So, if a world-renowned author believes that ties are an important part of life, he is probably right! And any good tie requires a good knot, like Hannover. This is also perfect for bigger men because it highlights its proportions. Look at this guide to tie this elegant knot, so you can stand out like a boss.

Although several steps are required to complete, the Hanover is not a particularly difficult knot. Most of these steps are simply repetitions or reversals of the same spin pattern. If you can tie a Half Windsor, you will have no trouble tying a Hanover.

Summary of The Hannover Knot
Difficulty level: medium
Formality: business, social (at least semi-formal)
Recommended necklaces: separate necklaces, cut necklaces
More suitable for: men with wide faces/torsos

Hannover Knot - History
The Hannover knot supposedly takes its name from the House of Hannover, the royal dynasty that ruled the United Kingdom from 1714 to 1901. But there is not much evidence that no monarch during that period really started it.

And since that period was mostly under Queen Victoria's reign, this modern style of the tie could not have been so popular back then. The name is more likely to be based on the mathematical relationship between the nodes of Hannover, Windsor, and Half-Windsor.

Hanover Knot - Description and use
The Hannover knot is a type of large and symmetrical tie knot.

A correctly executed Hannover knot forms an equilateral triangle. Its symmetry is very different, and we know how humans are naturally attracted to objects that have a perfect shape.

In business environments, this knot is a strong status symbol: an excellent way to increase your credibility (as you enter the room with a perfect tie). You can show others that you are a true professional with a good eye for details.

But at the same time, a very large knot of this type may seem a bit pompous. Therefore, you must find out the correct tie to get a Hannover knot that is framed correctly. To start: since the knot is quite bulky, you will want a nice and flattie that does not have much extra length.

As for the dress shirt to wear, an extended neck is ideal. And because the finished knot shows a large, flat band, this is a tie style that can work really well on figures or wallpaper patterns.

How To Tie Hanover Knot - Step by step in 11 Steps

  1. Wrap the tie around your neck with the exposed seam and the thick end to your left, hanging 4-5 inches lower than the desired finishing position.
  2. Cross the thick end below the narrow end from left to right, creating an X.
  3. Bring the thick end through the front of the narrow end from right to left. Hold on to the forming knot with one hand.
  4. Tuck the thick end through the loop around your collar.
  5. Bring the thick end down and throw it away. - but DO NOT put it through the horizontal band that you created in Step 4.
  6. Bring the thick end from right to left, crossing behind the knot.
  7. Turn the thick end up, passing diagonally in front of the center.
  8. Feed the thick end down through the loop and let it come out from behind the knot, hanging to your right.
  9. Bring the thick end horizontally from right to left. This creates a second horizontal band. Swipe a finger under this band.
  10. Nex, bring the thick end up, passing once more under the loop around your collar.
  11. Bring the thick end down through the horizontal band and adjust everything in place.

Congratulations! Now you have a Hannover knot to amplify your style on those special occasions. But although a less formal tie knot tends to be common in casual and social settings, who can say you should always follow the flock?

As long as you have enough confidence, you will surely impress everyone with your Hannover style, regardless of the event. A solid knot like this highlights the elegant gentleman inside.

12. Plattsburgh Knot


How to tie the Plattsburgh knot | Tie knots for bigger men
The Plattsburgh knot.

Sounds familiar?

Well, Plattsburgh is a city in New York ...

On the left side of Lake Champlain.

And it is the hometown of the inventor, Thomas Fink (co-author of The 85 Ways to Tie a Tie). If you are a big guy who needs a tie knot that fits your size or fits your extended neck, Plattsburgh is for you.

Summary of The Plattsburgh Knot
Long size
Symmetry: yes
Difficulty level: medium
Formality: business or social clothing
Recommended collars: separate collars (semi or complete)
More suitable for: men with longer torsos and narrower faces

Plattsburgh Knot - Description and use
A duly tied Plattsburgh knot shows a rather symmetrical and elongated triangle shape, with a small opening at the bottom.

Its structure is less wide than most knots of a similar volume (such as the San Andres knot), which makes it quite compatible with extended necklaces.

That is basically the reason why it is a great option for larger men with narrower faces. On the other hand, a wider knot would risk accentuating the lack of width of a man's face or torso.

In terms of material and tie design: Plattsburgh knots go extremely well with smooth surface ties that show (1) a simple pattern or (2) a solid color.

The idea behind this is to let the symmetrical triangle be the focus, and keep the rest of the tie classy. That makes the Plattsburgh knot perfect for business-related functions.

The mooring method requires more "passes" than other tie knots in general. Therefore, be very careful during the process to keep the turns as even and symmetrical as possible, taking out all the slack from each one. The end result will be absolutely worth it.

How To Tie Plattsburgh Knot - Step by step in 10 Steps

  1. Place the tie around your neck with the exposed seam and the thick end to your left, 4-5 inches lower than the desired finishing position.
  2. Cross the thick end of the tie under the narrow end to form an X. Hold on to that X and turn the tip of the thick end up over the front of the bow around your neck.
  3. Tuck the thick end through the loop and bring it back to its left side.
  4. Point the thick end up.
  5. Replace the thick end in front of the loop, staying to the left of the narrow end.
  6. Tuck the thick end down through the loop, emerging to your right.
  7. Bring the thick end horizontally across the front of the knot from right to left. Swipe a finger under the horizontal band you just created.
  8. Tuck the thick end up through the loop around your neck from behind.
  9. Feed the thick end down through the horizontal band and adjust it firmly.
  10. Tighten holding the knot with one hand and pulling the narrow end with the other. Adjust the edges to make it look symmetrical.

Helpful tips
Keep your tie neat and tidy by pulling the narrow end through the safety tie on the back of the tie. You can use a tack or tie bar to hold it in place if the narrow end is too short for the archer's bow.


Your tie should rest between the top and middle of your belt line. If it is too short, start again by lowering the wide end. If it is too long, start with the highest wide end. The Plattsburgh tie knot is a classic knot that will serve you in any situation.

Congratulations! You just finished tying the Plattsburgh knot. Enjoy the elegant appearance and the beautiful triangle shape. It will really help to increase your confidence, especially when it comes to business occasions or configurations.

13. Grantchester Knot


How to tie the Grantchester knot | The best large tie knots
Are you a boy who loves the tie knot Four in Hand, but need something that looks great with your neck extended? Gentlemen, today I have the perfect knot for you. Today we will learn to tie the Grantchester knot. The Grantchester knot looks like the Four in the hand, but with the size of the Full Windsor, so it has the perfect knot to balance an extended necklace or a larger physique. This particular knot uses a lot of cloth, so unless you're a shorter man, you might want to wear a tie that is longer than average.
Therefore, it is definitely worth a try (especially if you have a larger chest). Keep reading the step-by-step instructions to tie the Grandchester knot.

Grantchester knot summary
Long size
Symmetry: no
Difficulty level: medium
Formality: business or social environments
Recommended necklaces: full extension necklaces, cut necklaces
More suitable for: men with larger torsos

Grantchester Knot - History
The Grantchester knot is part of a family of "inside out" knots, where the tie is initially covered around the collar with its seam (backside) exposed instead of hidden. The final stage hides the seams of the ends looking at each other, while the rest of the tie is covered by the collar.

The history of the name is not clear. Thomas Fink and Yong Mao have used the knot in their mathematical study of ties, The 85 Ways to Tie a Tie. And like several tie knots, the name could come from a town in England near Cambridge, where Fink and Mao studied.

Grantchester Knot - Description and use
The Grantchester is a fairly large knot, similar to the Windsor in thickness but slightly shorter in height. It is also notable for having the same asymmetric shape as the four in the hand.

Then, in this case, you will have to wear a relatively thin tie to prevent it from becoming too bulky. You'll also want a tie that is longer than the average tie to provide more allowance (unless you're a shorter boy).

How To Tie Grantchester Knot - Step by step in 11 Steps

  1. Place the tie around your neck with the seam facing out and the thick end to your left, 4-5 inches lower than the desired finishing position.
  2. Cross the thick end under the thin end, forming an X.
  3. Wrap the thick end through the front of the thin end, going horizontally from right to left.
  4. Then wrap the thick end from left to right behind the thin end.
  5. Now wrap the thick end in the front from right to left. Use a finger to hold the horizontal band you just made in place.
  6. Slide the thick end of the tie under the bow around your neck.
  7. Turn the thick end down and let it hang in front of the knot. Keep using your finger to hold the band in place.
  8. Wrap the thick end behind the knot from right to left.
  9. Wrap the thick end around the front of the knot from left to right and insert a finger under the horizontal band you created.
  10. Pass the thick end through the loop around your collar from below.
  11. Pass the thick end down through the horizontal band, adjust it and pull the corners of the knot evenly.

The Grantchester Knot - Additional Reminders

  • Adjust the tie by grasping the knot with one hand while gently pulling the thin end with the other.
  • The finished knot should be large, slightly tilted at the top and adjusted against the collar. It looks best with a full or reasonably wide extended collar (while thicker ties may need a large cut extension).
  • A properly tied Grantchester is a conservative knot. It works well for business and formal events. It is also a great option if you feel comfortable with a four in your hand but you need to wear a little more tie.

Gentlemen, that's all. The Grantchester tie knot is the perfect choice to combine with the extended neck regardless of the occasion.

14. Victoria Knot

How to tie Victoria's knot | Medium-sized tie knots
This night is the night.

You want to enjoy it ... but you must also look good!

So prepare yourself:

Shirt ... check
Jacket ... check
Jeans ... check
Shoes ... check
Tie ... oh wait
You tie your tie as usual ... but something is wrong.

It just looks too long.

Quick solution? The Victoria knot.

It's easy: learn the steps to link it below.

Victoria knot summary
Knot Size: Medium
Symmetry: no
Difficulty level: easy
Formality: casual or business events
Recommended necklaces: knitted necklaces, button necklaces

Victoria Knot - History
You guessed it: this knot is named after Queen Victoria of England (although it is very unlikely that she used it herself). There is no apparent correlation between the style of the knot and the queen herself.

Victoria Knot - Description and use
But the Victoria knot is (technically) a more voluminous and complex version of a Four in hand. For a single extra pass through the front. So maybe "Victoria" has something to do with the fact that it is a bit more sophisticated?

That additional loop is partly the reason why some men prefer it to four in hand since the end result of the draw is never too long.

At the same time, Victoria remains a medium knot. It does not reach a point where it requires a wide neck extension or becomes too bulky in thicker ties.

The Victoria is ideal for thin ties, where a little extra thickness prevents the knot from tense so much and becomes super small. If you are looking for something "relaxed" and the four in hand is not enough, this is the knot that is useful.

Combine it with a properly narrow tip or buttoned collar. Unless your tie is very thick, this knot will be too small for a wider extension or a cut neck.


How To Tie Victoria Knot - Step by step in 8 Steps

  1. Place the tie around your neck with the seam inward and the thick end to your left, approximately 2-3 inches lower than the desired finishing position.
  2. Cross the thick end of the tie horizontally in front of the narrow end and then behind it.
  3. Pass the thick end through the front again from left to right.
  4. Pass the thick end behind the knot from right to left.
  5. Pass the thick end along the front for the third time and slide a finger under the new horizontal band you just created.
  6. Insert the thick end through the loop around your collar, coming out from under.
  7. Feed the thick end down through the horizontal band.
  8. Adjust the thick end in place. Adjust by holding the knot with one hand and gently pulling the narrow end with the other hand.

Now for the finishing touches:

Adjust the tie by holding the knot with one hand and gently pulling the narrow end with the other hand.
Make some minor adjustments with your fingers if desired. The Victoria knot is not symmetrical, so the sides are not supposed to look perfectly even.
Congratulations! Your Victoria knot is complete. Now you can go out in style.

15. Cafe Knot


How to tie the coffee knot | Tie knots
The coffee knot, as the name implies, was a style favored by those who frequented coffee at the beginning of the 20th century.

It is an elegant and unnecessarily complicated knot, designed to draw attention to the skill of tying the dressing knot (and, in general, also to its fine silk tie). It is definitely an excellent option to start a conversation at an informal party.

Cafe Knot Summary
Medium size
Symmetry: no
Difficulty: difficult
Formality: only casual/social clothing
Recommended necklaces: Point, button-down

The Cafe Knot - Description and use
The Cafe Knot is not very symmetrical since one "leg" of the triangle is superimposed on the other.

The finished product has a different pair of downward diagonals that frame the center of the triangular knot. It is not entirely symmetrical since one "leg" of the triangle is superimposed on the other.

While the finished knot is not as bulky as a Windsor or Balthus, it requires a good amount of length to tie. Ideally, the two "legs" of the frame should be tied with the thin center of the tie; otherwise, they will completely hide the knot between them.

This is an excellent knot to wear with a casual suit or a more elegant sports jacket, or even with shirt sleeves in a social environment. It should not be used for an office job or any type of serious event.

The coffee knot is interesting because it is mainly tied with the narrow end of the tie, unlike most knots, which work primarily with the thicker end.

The thick end will only make a short loop at the end, so start only half an inch or more than the finished loop wants.

It may take several attempts to do this well. It is not a knot for beginners, and is not particularly functional, beyond its decorative purpose.


How To Tie The Cafe Knot - Step by step in 16 Steps

  1. Place the tie around your neck with the seam inward and the thick end to your right, approximately half an inch lower than you want the finished tie to hang.
  2. Cross the thin end over the thick end, forming an X. Then, raise the thin end through the loop you just formed, behind the X.
  3. Turn the thin end over the top of the knot.
  4. Bring the thin end behind the knot from left to right.
  5. Then, pass the thin end through the front from right to left.
  6. Now wear the thin end behind the knot and up through the loop around the neck. This will leave a horizontal band at the front of the knot.
  7. Turn the thin end over the front of the knot so that it hangs down.
  8. Bring the thin end slightly to the left of the thick end, then fold it behind the knot, turning from left to right.
  9. Bring the thin end toward the front of the knot, pointing the tip up and toward the left shoulder.
  10. Tuck the thin end through the loop around your collar, behind the rest of the knot and emerging on the left side of the thick end.
  11. Pull the thin end down firmly and take a moment to organize the center of the knot. You want the diagonal legs to rise at the same angle, meeting directly under the chin.
  12. Turn the thickness forward and up. You can throw it over one shoulder.
  13. Turn the thin end up and slide it through the single horizontal loop at the back of the knot.
  14. Pull the thin end all over the loop and adjust it well.
  15. Turn the two ends of the tie-down.
  16. Gently squeeze holding the knot in one hand while pulling the thick end with the other.

You must press The Cafe Knot carefully. Because the thin end is the working end (unlike many ties), it actually adjusts by holding the knot in one hand while pulling the thick end with the other. Tighten until the knot is snug against your neck, and then adjust the tie until the knot is centered.

Slide the thin end through the label or the loop on the back of the thick end, if it is still long enough. Otherwise, use a tie bar or similar accessory to hold the ends together.

Bravo! Now you have a lovely three-legged knot that shows your ability to tie knots! You've mastered one of the most complicated tie knots that exist, so give yourself a pat on the back. And, of course, allow others to bathe in your glory.

But since you are now a tie knot professional, you should also know some other different ways to tie ties ... after all, people may ask you for advice now.

16. Eldredge Knot


How to tie Eldredge's knot? Is this tie too much?
Eldredge's knot.

Some describe it as a "work of art."

Others describe it as "too much."

This futuristic knot draws much attention to the unusual end result.

Whatever your opinion, this knot is a conversation starter.

Eldredge's knot is a tie knot for elegant gentlemen who are not afraid to get attention. And we will show you how to tie it. (Be prepared, this requires practice!)

Summary of Eldredge's knot
Unusual junction knot shape: the finished shape consists of four diagonal bands and a horizontal band, all layered on top of each other.
Asymmetry: the shape is not very symmetrical (the right side of the knot will be thicker than the left since the diagonals on the right are on the diagonals on the left), and
Collar requirement: the size of the knot requires an extended collar.
Elegant appearance: the unusual shape of this knot is appropriate only for casual and social use.

Eldredge's knot - History
Eldredge's knot was invented by Jeffrey Eldredge, a systems administrator who got tired of using a four-handed knot to work every day. Inspired by the Ediety knot, he began tying his tie using the tail end instead of the wide end.

Eldredge's knot - Description and use
It may take several attempts to tie this difficult knot correctly. Practice it several times before using it in public. Remember, this is an exaggeratedly extravagant knot that should only be used to achieve a dramatic effect.

With such a striking knot, your tie and your outfit should be as quiet and simple as possible.

The striking effect of the knot is best shown with solid colored ties or with subtle patterns. Avoid wearing a striped tie for this knot: the stripes will make the knot look unbalanced and very busy.

Before starting with the step-by-step instructions below, follow these preparatory steps:

Secure the top button of your shirt and lift your neck.
Wrap the tie around your neck with the wide end to the right and the thin end to the left with the seams facing down.
Make sure that every slack and knot is released at every step. You will find it difficult to adjust a little slacker once you have placed the tie in an earlier step.

How To Tie Eldredge knot: step by step in 13 Steps

  1. Place the tie around your neck, with the thick end to the right exactly where you want it to hang when the knot is completed.
  2. Pinch the wide end of the tie to form a dimple and cross the thin end in front of the thick end as horizontally as possible.
  3. Wrap the thin end behind the cross shape, crossing horizontally from right to left.
  4. Tuck the thin end through the loop around your collar.
  5. Bring the thin end horizontally through the thick end.
  6. Tuck the tip of the thin end up through the loop around your collar and rotate it over the top of the knot, crossing diagonally down from left to right. Pull down comfortably to form a diagonal band along the right side of the knot.
  7. Bring the thin end around the back of the knot and up through the diagonal band.
  8. Advance and pull hard to create a diagonal band on each side.
  9. Point the thin end of the tie-up, then tuck it under the bow around your neck, emerging to the right of the knot.
  10. Wrap the thin end of the tie and around the circle around your collar. Leave a little slack in this step.
  11. Tuck the tip of the thin end down and to the left, under the loop around your neck, and up through the loop you just created.
  12. Turn the thin end over the top of the loop around your collar.
  13. Tuck the rest of the thin end out of sight, either behind the thick end or by sliding it horizontally under the loop around your neck. Tighten if necessary by pulling the thick end and adjust each diagonal band to approximately the same width.

The Eldredge is a difficult knot to tie, so don't worry if you don't get it the first time. The result is worth it, as it helps people remember you.

17. Trinity Knot

The Trinity Knot - Are you man enough to wear this tie knot?
Are you man enough to wear a Trinity Knot?

This striking clover-shaped knot that is guaranteed to stand out. The knot is quite large and impossible to lose. As you may have guessed, it is difficult to master. Some men love him, others hate him. We will let you be the judge!

Trinity knot summary
Long size
Symmetry: trilateral symmetry
Difficulty: difficult
Formality: only social occasions
Recommended necklaces: separate necklaces, cut necklaces

The Trinity Knot - Description and use
The shape is symmetric along three axes that are in the center, rather than a vertical axis down in the center like most symmetric tie knots.

It is too "conceited" for business situations and can seem overwhelming in busy patterns. Select a relatively simple tie, one without too thick since the knot is quite bulky.

The shape of the knot is formed by the narrow end of the tie. This means that you will want to select a tie that has a narrow end relatively uncovered.

If there is a noticeable diagonal narrowing at the sides of the mooring near the narrow end, the three folds of the finished knot will not be the same size and the effect will be ruined.

This is one where the knot is its own reward.

There is no reason to learn it and move through the many steps of tying it unless you think you would enjoy having the unusual form of clover under the chin.

But if that sounds like something you want to do, this knot is practically your only way to do it, so follow it and don't be discouraged if you have to stop and restart a couple of times.

After all, if it were easy and convenient, it would have evolved into the "traditional" method of tying our ties decades ago.

How To Tie The Trinity Knot - Step by step in 12 Steps

  1. Place the tie around your neck with the seam inward and the thick end hanging to your right where you want the final length of the tie to be.
  2. Cross the narrow end diagonally in front of the thick end, forming an X, and tuck it under the loop around your neck.
  3. Replace the narrow end over the top of the loop.
  4. Pass the narrow end horizontally behind the thick end.
  5. Turn the narrow end over the top of the loop around your collar.
  6. Pass the tip of the narrow end down and out under the loop around your neck, at the right end of the knot.
  7. Bring the narrow end horizontally across the front of the knot from right to left. Slide one finger under the horizontal band that this creates.
  8. Wear the narrow end under the loop around your collar and down through the horizontal band. Slide one finger under the narrow end just above the knot.
  9. Pass the narrow end behind the thick end from right to left.
  10. Pass the tip of the narrow end over the loop around your collar and through the small vertical loop that you reserved in Step 8.
  11. Pull the narrow end all the way through the vertical loop, still angled diagonally up and to your right, and adjust it.
  12. Remove all clearance from the knot and adjust as necessary so that the three visible folds are identical in size and angle. Hide the narrow end either behind the thick end or under the loop around your collar.

This is a knot that may require some "dressing." Take a moment to straighten the three folds and remove any remaining slack from the knot.

You can tighten by holding the knot with one hand and gently pulling the thick end, but do it carefully and adjust the folds of the knot as you go. If you pull down hard on the thick end, it will end up distorting the shape of the knot.

I love it or hate it, The Trinity Knot is certainly unique.

18. Christensen knot


How to tie Christensen's knot
Do you want to stand out with an elegant tie knot, but do not want something as striking as Eldredge or Trinity?

Today we will learn to tie the Christensen knot, also known as the cross knot. The Christensen knot has an additional fold of fabric at the top that adds a visual touch without having the complete complex designs of the other novel knots.

Christensen knot summary
Medium size
Symmetry: diagonal symmetry
Difficulty: difficult
Formality: informal business or social
Recommended necklaces: separate necklaces

Christensen's knot: description and use
Christensen has humble origins. It was first used by a catalog of Swedish mail orders for pre-tied and clip ties, where the knot was sewn in place and never untied.

Tied correctly, the knot forms a stylized X throughout the neck. It tends to tense and narrow in the center, but extends at the top and bottom, resulting in an hourglass figure.

Showing the curved "bottleneck" in the center requires a soft tie, so stay away from thick fabrics in this case. The patterns must also be kept small and minimal. This is an excellent knot to dress a plain tie a little.

Because the unique form will give people a double opinion, this is not an ideal knot for strict business situations. Use it in casual and everyday business environments (not informal meetings or presentations) instead, or in social events that require ties.

How To Tie Christensen's knot: step by Step in 11 Step

  1. Place the tie around your neck with the thick end to the left. This end should hang between four and six inches less than the final length you want.
  2. Cross the thick end horizontally in front of the thin end from left to right.
  3. Bring the thick end around the thin end horizontally from right to left.
  4. Turn the thick end up in front of the loop around your collar.
  5. Tuck the thick end down behind the loop around your collar, emerging on the right side of the thin end.
  6. Bring the thick end to the front through the front horizontal band and the diagonal one you created in Step 5. Slide a finger under this new horizontal cross.
  7. Bring the thick end around the knot from left to right.
  8. Bring the thick end through the front, just above the horizontal crease you made in Step 6. (Your finger should still keep the crease open). Hold both horizontal bands lightly attached to the collar with one finger.
  9. Wear the thick end under the loop around your neck.
  10. Tuck the thick end down behind the two horizontal crosses and pull it.
  11. Pull the knot in place by holding it with one hand. Now gently pull the thin end with the other. Use your finger to decipher the diagonal folds until the X shape of the knot is very clear.

Done correctly, there must be a different hourglass cone: narrower in the middle of the knot and wider in the upper and lower part. You may need an extended wide collar to avoid hiding the upper corners of the knot below the points of your collar.

Congratulations! You have completed the only Christensen knot. This outstanding tie style will animate any casual or casual business attire you plan to wear. Don't be surprised if people stop and take a double-take when they notice that their tie does not resemble other people's ties!

 

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