Goethe's Faust (Download-PDF-Book Review-Online Reading-Summary)

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Summary: Faust by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe The Faust of Johann Wolfgang von Goethe is a tragic work, although more appropriately it should be defined as a tragicomedy, despite the very title of the work. It was published in two parts: Faust. Der Tragödie Erster Teil (translated as Faust: The first part of the tragedy) and Faust. Der Tragödie zweiter Teil (Faust: the second part of the tragedy). The work is a wardrobe drama, which means that it must be read instead of interpreted. It is the most famous work of Goethe and is considered by many as one of the best works of German literature. Goethe completed a preliminary version of Part One in 1806. The publication of 1808 was followed by the revised edition of 1828-1829, which was the last edited by Goethe himself. Before these appeared a partial impression in 1790 of Faust, a Fragment. The oldest forms of the work, known as Urfaust, were developed between 1772 and 1775; however, the details of that development are no longer clear. Goethe finished writing Faust Part Two in 1832, the year of his death. In contrast to Faust Part One, the focus here is no longer on the soul of Faust, which has been sold to the devil, but rather on social phenomena such as psychology, history, and politics. The second part formed the main occupation of the last years of Goethe and appeared only posthumously in 1832.Faust is a tragic work in two parts of Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, generally known in English as Faust, Part One and Faust, Part Two. Although it is rarely staged in its entirety, it is the work with the largest audience in the German language stages. Many consider that Faust is the masterpiece of Goethe and the most important work of German literature.The oldest forms of the work, known as Urfaust, were developed between 1772 and 1775; however, the details of that development are not entirely clear. Urfaust has twenty-two scenes, one in prose, two largely prose and the remaining 1,441 lines in rhymed verse. The manuscript was lost, but a copy was discovered in 1886. The first appearance of the printed work was Faust, a Fragment, published in 1790. Goethe completed a preliminary version of what is now known as Part One in 1806. Its publication in 1808 was followed by the revised edition of 1828-29, the last to be edited by Goethe himself. Goethe finished writing Faust Part Two in 1831. Unlike Faust Part One, the focus here is no longer on the soul of Faust, which has been sold to the devil, but rather to social phenomena such as psychology, history, and politics, in addition to mystical and philosophical themes. The second part formed the main occupation of the last years of Goethe. It appeared only posthumously in 1832.

About The Author: Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (/ˈɡɜːrtə/; German: [ˈjoːhan ˈvɔlfɡaŋ fɔn ˈɡøːtə] (About this sound listen); 28 August 1749 – 22 March 1832) was a German writer and statesman. His works include epic and lyric poetry; prose and verse dramas; memoirs; an autobiography; literary and aesthetic criticism; treatises on botany, anatomy, and color; and four novels. In addition, numerous literary and scientific fragments, more than 10,000 letters, and nearly 3,000 drawings by him exist.A literary celebrity by the age of 25, Goethe was ennobled by the Duke of Saxe-Weimar, Carl August in 1782 after taking up residence there in November 1775 following the success of his first novel, The Sorrows of Young Werther. He was an early participant in the Sturm und Drang literary movement. During his first ten years in Weimar, Goethe was a member of the Duke's privy council, sat on the war and highway commissions, oversaw the reopening of silver mines in nearby Ilmenau, and implemented a series of administrative reforms at the University of Jena. He also contributed to the planning of Weimar's botanical park and the rebuilding of its Ducal Palace, which in 1998 were together designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site.His first major scientific work, the Metamorphosis of Plants, was published after he returned from a 1788 tour of Italy. In 1791, he was made managing director of the theatre at Weimar, and in 1794 he began a friendship with the dramatist, historian, and philosopher Friedrich Schiller, whose plays he premiered until Schiller's death in 1805. During this period, Goethe published his second novel, Wilhelm Meister's Apprenticeship, the verse epic Hermann and Dorothea, and, in 1808, the first part of his most celebrated drama, Faust. His conversations and various common undertakings throughout the 1790s with Schiller, Johann Gottlieb Fichte, Johann Gottfried Herder, Alexander von Humboldt, Wilhelm von Humboldt, and August and Friedrich Schlegel have, in later years, been collectively termed Weimar Classicism.Arthur Schopenhauer cited Wilhelm Meister's Apprenticeship as one of the four greatest novels ever written, along with Tristram Shandy, La Nouvelle Héloïse, and Don Quixote,and Ralph Waldo Emerson selected Goethe as one of six "representative men" in his work of the same name, along with Plato, Emanuel Swedenborg, Michel de Montaigne, Napoleon, and William Shakespeare. Goethe's comments and observations from the basis of several biographical works, most notably Johann Peter Eckermann's Conversations with Goethe.