Les Miserables By Victor Hugo (Summary, Book Review, Online Reading, PDF, Download)

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Author Victor Hugo
Illustrator Emile Bayard
Country France
Language French
Genre Epic novel, historical fiction
Publisher A. Lacroix, Verboeckhoven & Cie.
Publication date
1862

Review: "The genius of Hugo was the creation of a simple and recognizable myth.The great success of" Les Miserables "as a didactic work in favor of the poor and oppressed is due to his poetic and expanded vision of human nature. V. S. Pritchett"It was Tolstoy who vindicated Hugo's early ambition to judge" Les Miserables "one of the great novels of the world, if not the greatest [His] ability to present the extremes of the experience" as they are "is, in the end, Hugo's great gift. " From the introduction of Peter Washington

Summary: Les Misérables by Victor Hugo: Les Misérables is a novel by the French author Victor Hugo and is widely considered one of the greatest novels of the nineteenth century. It follows the lives and interactions of various French characters over a period of twenty years at the beginning of the 19th century, beginning in 1815, the year of Napoleon's final defeat at Waterloo. The novel focuses on the struggles of ex-convict Jean Valjean and his experience of redemption. It examines the nature of law and grace and exposes the history of France, the architecture of Paris, politics, moral philosophy, anti-monarchy, justice, religion and types and the nature of romantic and family love. The story is historical fiction because it contains real and historical facts, including the 1832 Paris Uprising (often confused with the much earlier French Revolution).'It was no longer Jean Valjean, but No. 24601'The story of injustice, heroism, and love of Victor Hugo follows the fate of Jean Valjean, a convicted fugitive determined to leave behind his criminal past. But his attempts to become a respected member of the community are constantly threatened: by his own conscience, when, due to a case of mistaken identity, another man is arrested in his place; and by the implacable investigations of the stubborn police Javert. It is not only for him that Valjean must remain free, however, because he has sworn to protect Fantine's daughter, pushed into prostitution by poverty. A convincing and compassionate vision of the victims of French society at the beginning of the 19th century, Les Misérables is a novel on an epic scale, moving inexorably from the Battle of Waterloo to the revolution of July 1830. The introduction of Norman Denny to his cheerful English translation discusses Hugo's political and artistic goals in writing Les Misérables.The genius of Hugo was for the creation of a simple and recognizable myth. The great success of Les Miserables as a didactic work in favor of the poor and oppressed is due to its poetic and extended vision of the human nature of the myth.- - V. S. Pritchett -Fue Tolstoi who claimed the early ambition [of Hugo] to judge Les Miserables as one of the great novels of the world, if not the greatest ... [His] ability to present the extremes of the experience 'as they are' is, in the end, the Great gift of Hugo.- - From the Introduction by Peter Washington"Hugo's genius was the creation of a simple and recognizable myth.The great success of Les Miserables as a didactic work in the name of the poor and oppressed is due to his poetic and extended vision of human nature." --V. S. Pritchett"It was Tolstoy who claimed the early ambition [of Hugo] when judging Les Misérables one of the great novels of the world, if not the greatest ... [His] ability to present the extremes of the experience 'as they are' is, in the end, Hugo's great gift. " - Since the introduction by Peter Washington

About The Author: Victor Hugo was born in Besançon in 1802, the youngest of the three children of an officer, who took his family with him from publication to publication, to Italy and Spain. Victor's prolific literary career began with the publication of poems, a novel and a drama, Cromwell, whose preface remains a great manifesto of French romanticism. The disturbances caused in the first representation of his drama Hernani (1830) established him as a leading figure among the romantics, and Notre-Dame (1831) increased his prestige at home and abroad. In exile in Brussels, Jersey, and Guernsey, he published some of his best works. Only with the defeat and replacement of Napoleon III by the Third Republic did Hugo return, to be elected deputy, and then senator. His opposition to tyranny and the continuation of the immense literary production established him as a national hero. When he died in 1885 he was honored by the burial in the Pantheon.

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