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Of Mice and Men By John Steinbeck (Book - Summary - Book Review - Online Reading - Download - PDF- Book Order)

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Of Mice and Men is a novel written by author John Steinbeck. Published in 1937, tells the story of George Milton and Lennie Small, two migrant workers displaced from the ranch, moving from one place to another in California in search of new job opportunities during the Great Depression in the United States.
Steinbeck based the novel on his own experiences working with migrant farm workers as a teenager in the 1910s (before the arrival of the Okies, he would describe vividly in The Grapes of Wrath). The title is taken from Robert Burns's poem "To a Mouse", which says: "The best-established schemes of 'mice an' men / Gang aft agley." (The best-established patterns of mice and men / often go wrong).
Although it is a book that is taught in many schools, Of Mice and Men has been a frequent target of the censors of the vulgarity and what some consider offensive and racist language; consequently, it appears in the list of the Library of the United States of the most challenged books of the 21st century.

Review: Of Mice and Men is a thriller, an exciting story that runs to the length of the novel and that you will not leave until it is finished. It is more than that; but it is that. . . . Insure, strident, vulgar Americanism, Steinbeck has played the fast in his little story. The New York Times Brutality and tenderness mingle in these strangely moving pages. . . . The reader is fascinated by the certainty of impending doom. Chicago Tribune A brief history of much power and beauty. Mr. Steinbeck has contributed a small masterpiece in the modern hard school of American fiction. Times Literary Supplement [London] "" Of Mice and Men is a thriller, an exciting story that runs to the length of the novel that you will not leave blank until it is finished. It is more than that; but it is that. . . . Ensure, strident, vulgar Americanism, Steinbeck has played the fast in his little story. "- The New York Times" Brutality and tenderness are mixed in these strangely moving pages. . . . The reader is fascinated by the certainty of the approaching fatality. "- Chicago Tribune" A brief history of much power and beauty. Mr. Steinbeck has contributed a small masterpiece in the modern hard school of American fiction. "- Times Literary Supplement [London]
About The Author: Jhn Steinbeck (1902-1968) is remembered as one of the greatest and best-loved American writers of the 20th century. During the 1930s, his works included The Red Pony, Pastures of Heaven, Tortilla Flat, In Dubious Battle and Of Mice and Men. The Grapes of Wrath, published in 1939, earned him a Pulitzer Prize. In 1962, he was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature

Summary
Two migrant field workers in California on their plantation during the Great Depression George Milton, an intelligent but uneducated man, and Lennie Small, a bulky and strong but mentally disabled man are in Soledad on their way to another part of California. They hope that someday they will achieve the dream of settling on their own piece of land. The part of Lennie's dream is simply to care for and pet rabbits on the farm, since he loves to touch soft animals, although he always kills them. This dream is one of Lennie's favorite stories, which George constantly retells. They had fled Weed after Lennie touched a young girl's dress and they did not release him, prompting an accusation of rape. It soon becomes clear that the two are close and that George is Lennie's protector, despite his antics.

After being hired on a farm, the two face the aggressive little son of Curley The Boss with a complex of Napoleon who does not like the bigger men and begins to attack Lennie. Curley's flirtatious and provocative wife, whom Lennie is instantly attracted to, also poses a problem. In contrast, the couple also meets Candy, an elderly handyman ranch with a hand and a loyal dog, and Slim, a smart and gentle hairdresser who recently had a litter of puppies. Slim gives a puppy to Lennie and Candy, whose loyal sheepdog was assaulted by his ranch partner Carlson.

Despite the problems, her dream jumps to reality when Candy offers to throw $ 350 with George and Lennie so they can buy a farm at the end of the month, in exchange for a permit to live with them. The trio is ecstatic, but their joy is overshadowed when Curley attacks Lennie, who defends himself by easily crushing Curley's fist while George exhorts him.

However, George feels more relaxed, to the extent that he even leaves Lennie at the ranch while going to town with the other hands of the ranch. Lennie goes into the barn and talks with Crooks, the stable and bitter but educated dollar, which is isolated from the other workers racially. Candy finds them and they discuss their plans for the farm with Crooks, who cannot resist asking if they can put a garden patch on the farm, even if this is not possible. Curley's wife makes another appearance and flirts with the men, especially with Lennie. However, his spiteful side is shown when he disparages them and threatens Crooks with lynching him.
The next day, Lennie accidentally kills his puppy while caressing him. Curley's wife enters the barn and tries to talk to Lennie, admitting that she is alone and how her dreams of becoming a movie star are crushed, revealing her personality. After discovering Lennie's habit, she offers to let him stroke her hair, but panics and starts screaming when she feels his strength. Lennie is frightened, and then involuntarily breaks her neck and flees. When the other hands of the ranch find the body, George realizes that his dream is coming to an end. George rushes to find Lennie, hoping he's in the meeting place they designated in case he got into trouble.

George meets Lennie at the site, his place to camp before arriving at the ranch. The two sit together and George retells the beloved dream story, knowing that it is something they will never share. Then he shoots and kills Lennie, with Curley, Slim, and Carlson arriving seconds later. Only Slim realizes what happened, and moves away with comfort. Curley and Carlson observe, unable to understand the moderate mood of the two men.

About the Author
John Steinbeck, born in Salinas, California, in 1902, grew up in a fertile agricultural valley, some twenty-five miles from the Pacific coast. Both the valley and the coast would serve as a stage for some of his best works of fiction. In 1919 he went to Stanford University, where he enrolled intermittently in courses in literature and writing until he left in 1925 without having graduated. For the next five years, he remained a worker and journalist in New York City, working all the time on his first novel, the Gold Cup (1929).

After marrying and moving to Pacific Grove, he published two books from California, Los pastors del Cielo (1932) and To a God Unknown (1933), and worked on short stories compiled later in The Long Valley (1938). Popular success and financial security came only with Tortilla Flat (1935), stories about the countrymen of Monterrey. An incessant experimenter throughout his career, Steinbeck changed course regularly. Three powerful novels of the late 1930s focused on the working class of California: In Dubious Battle (1936), Of Mice and Men (1937), and the book considered by many to be their best, The Grapes of Wrath (1939). ). Grapes of Wrath won the National Book Prize and the Pulitzer Prize in 1939.

In the early 1940s, Steinbeck became a filmmaker for The Forgotten Village (1941) and a serious student of marine biology at Sea of Cortez (1941). He dedicated his services to the war, writing Bombs Away (1942) and the controversial theatrical novel The Moon is Down (1942). Cannery Row (1945), The Wayward Bus (1948), another experimental drama, Burning Bright (1950), and The Log from the Sea of Cortez (1951) preceded the publication of the monumental East of Eden (1952), an ambitious saga of The Valley of Salinas and the story of his own family.

The last decades of his life were spent in New York City and in Sag Harbor with his third wife, with whom he traveled a lot. Later books include Sweet Thursday (1954), The Short Reign of Pippin IV: A Fabrication (1957), Once Was A War (1958), The Winter of Our Discontent (1961), Travels with Charley in Search of America (1962), America and Americans (1966), and the posthumously published Journal of a Novel: The East of Eden Letters (1969), Viva Zapata! (1975), The acts of King Arthur and his noble knights (1976), and Days of work: The diaries of the grapes of wrath (1989).

Steinbeck received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1962 and, in 1964, President Lyndon B. Johnson presented him with the United States Medal of Freedom. Steinbeck died in New York in 1968. Today, more than thirty years after his death, he remains one of the most important writers and cultural figures in America.

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Author John Steinbeck
Cover artist Ross MacDonald
Country United States
Language English
Publisher Covici Friede
Publication date
1937
Pages 187