Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave Book By Frederick Douglass (PDF-Summary-Review-Online Reading-Download)

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Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave Book By Frederick Douglass is a memoir and treatise on abolition 1845 written by the famous orator and former slave Frederick Douglass during his time in Lynn, Massachusetts. Generally, it is considered the most famous in a series of narratives written by former slaves during the same period. In fact, the text describes the events of his life and is considered one of the most influential literary works to drive the abolitionist movement of the early 19th century in the United States.

The narrative of Frederick Douglass's life comprises eleven chapters that narrate Douglass's life as a slave and his ambition to become a free man. It contains two presentations by well-known white abolitionists: a preface by William Lloyd Garrison and a letter by Wendell Phillips, both arguing for the veracity of the story and its author's literacy.

Book Summary
A former slave, passionate abolitionist, brilliant writer, newspaper editor, and eloquent speaker whose speeches ignited the abolitionist cause, Frederick Douglass (1818-1895) led an amazing life. Physical abuse, deprivation, and tragedy plagued his early years, but through the strength of his character, he was able to overcome these obstacles to become a leading spokesperson for his people. In this, the first and most frequently read of his three autobiographies, Douglass provides graphic descriptions of his childhood and horrible experiences as a slave, as well as a heartbreaking record of his dramatic escape to the North and his eventual freedom. Published in 1845 to calm doubts about its origins, since few slaves from that period could write, the Narrative is admired today for its extraordinary passion, sensitive and vivid descriptions, and its narrative power. It belongs to the library of anyone interested in African American history and the life of one of the most courageous and influential civil rights advocates in the country. A selection from the Common Core State Standards Initiative.

Book Review
The passionate abolitionist and eloquent speaker provide graphic descriptions of his childhood and horrible experiences as a slave, as well as a heartbreaking record of his dramatic escape to the North and his eventual freedom.

Book Club Questions

About The Author of The Book Frederick Douglass
Frederick Douglass (né Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey) was born a slave in the state of Maryland in 1818. After his escape from slavery, Douglass became a renowned abolitionist, editor, and feminist. Having escaped from slavery at age 20, he took the name Frederick Douglass for himself and became an advocate of abolition. Douglass traveled widely, and often perilously, to lecture against slavery.

His first of three autobiographies, The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave, was published in 1845. In 1847 he moved to Rochester, New York, and started working with fellow abolitionist Martin R. Delany to publish a weekly anti-slavery newspaper, North Star. Douglass was the only man to speak in favor of Elizabeth Cady Stanton's controversial plank of woman suffrage at the first women's rights convention in Seneca Falls, New York, in 1848. As a signer of the Declaration of Sentiments, Douglass also promoted woman suffrage in his North Star. Douglass and Stanton remained lifelong friends.

In 1870 Douglass launched The New National Era out of Washington, D.C. He was nominated for vice-president by the Equal Rights Party to run with Victoria Woodhull as a presidential candidate in 1872. He became U.S. marshal of the District of Columbia in 1877 and was later appointed minister resident and consul-general to Haiti. His District of Columbia home is a national historic site. D. 1895.

 

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